ART HISTORY

ART HISTORY

We offer courses in the history of art, architecture, printmaking, photography, and film from the ancient through modern periods.

Winter2012NewsletterCurley
Teaching and Learning from the Masters
Students of John J. Curley are getting up close and personal with 31 of the most celebrated artists from the 1950s. The assistant professor for modern and contemporary art at Wake Forest University has designed his seminar, “Abstraction and Meaning,” to coincide with the Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum exhibition at Reynolda House.
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Students in print class curate exhibition in Hanes Art Gallery
In the studio where professor Bernadine Barnes’s History of Prints class meets, white-gloved students handle prints by Goya, Miró and Picasso.
They look closely at the progression of light and dark in the works and discuss the historical context of the prints — choosing those that best tell a short story of three Spanish artists for the Los Sueños exhibition on display in the campus art gallery.
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Students collaborate with faculty to curate exhibition: Domestic Bliss at Reynolda House Museum of American Art
Not many undergraduate students can claim that they collaborated with a professor to research and produce a piece of work. Thanks to the WFU Humanities Institute’s College Collaborations program, however, three Wake Forest juniors can now add the title of student curator and researcher to their resume.
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Work of Art: Thanks to student art-buying trips, Wake Forest’s collection is ever-evolving, and so are those who make the journey
A short walk through Benson is a journey through fifty years of contemporary art, made possible by a unique educational experience. Every four years since 1963, students, accompanied by faculty mentors, have gone to New York City to purchase art for the Student Union Collection of Contemporary Art — thought to be the only university art collection in the country developed by students.
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Disturbing the Peace: Wake Forest and the Arts
David Lubin, Charlotte C. Weber Professor of Art, delivers the 2008 Convocation Address
“In one of the last speeches he gave before he was assassinated, President John F. Kennedy spoke eloquently about the importance of the arts in democracy. The worth of a country, he observed, is inseparable from the quality of its arts, and no nation can be deemed great that does not produce and admire great art. “I look forward,” he concluded, “to an America which commands respect throughout the world not only for its strength but for its civilization as well.”
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