Art (ART)

The Art Department offers a BA degree in Studio Art and BA degree in Art History and a minor in Art.

Educational Goal

Our primary mission as a BA program is general knowledge of the field and acquisition of basic skills and visual and cultural literacy. In following the NASAD accreditation guidelines our “curriculum should aim primarily toward breadth of experience and understanding rather than professional specialization. “The primary objective of such training is not necessarily preparation for a career in art or design.” (NASAD, General Standards and Guidelines for Liberal Arts Degree Programs in the Visual Arts). Our primary mission is not preparation for graduate school, and yet, some of our graduates apply to and attend graduate programs in Art History and Studio Art. Others go to work in the art world in both the public and private sectors. Yet others find a life or career in other fields, which is part of our mission as a BA program in a liberal arts university.

Learning Outcomes for Students Earning a BA in Studio Art

Students will:

  1. Acquire the technical skills and an understanding of principles of visual organization sufficient to achieve basic visual communication and expression in one or more media
  2. Develop ability to think and act creatively through experimentation, analysis of options and parameters, development of effective solutions
  3. Engage in critical analysis of form and content relationships in an artwork
  4. Operate in a safe and independent manner in the artist studio
  5. Develop awareness of contemporary practice and historical precedence of various artistic mediums.

Learning Outcomes for Students Earning a BA in Art History

Students will:

  1. Develop awareness of the rich visual and material cultures of the past and present both in Western and non-Western regions.
  2. Understand and employ diverse critical frameworks for thinking and writing about images and objects.
  3. Understand works of art in their historical contexts.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to locate, evaluate, and synthesize information relevant to works of art and architecture from primary and secondary sources.
  5. Acquire functional knowledge of the creative process.

Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes are assessed individually in each class, through appropriate measures stated in the course syllabi.  In addition, all art history majors must submit a personal portfolio containing two pieces of writing and a one-page reflection: a research paper from a 200 or 300-level course that students consider their “best work” in the department and a writing sample from Art 394: Issues in Art History that demonstrates their knowledge of the broader discourses of art history.  The one-page reflection will address why the student selected these two pieces of writing.

Art History Learning Outcome Courses that cover this LO How to assess
General learning outcomes for all students—100 level courses100-level courses introduce students to a broad historical range of artistic production.  Art History majors must take either 103 or 105 for the major.
Develop awareness of the rich visual and material cultures of the past and present both in Western and non-Western regions. 103, 104, 105 Non majors & majors take tests or exams in these courses that require memorization and contextualization of art and monuments.
Recognize styles of particular regions, time periods, and individual artists; be able to describe how styles change through time; be able to discuss works in comparative perspective. 103, 104, 105 Non majors & majors take tests or exams that require them to acquire and use this information.  The format of the comparison essay in papers and/or tests requires them to demonstrate knowledge of change over time and comparative regional or cultural contexts.
Understand works of art in their historical contexts (how religion, literature, philosophy, and politics inform meaning). 103, 104, 105 Non majors & majors answer essay questions on tests and/or paper topics that require them to place works of art in a historical context.
Acquire, understand and employ the necessary vocabulary and critical frameworks to conceptualize art and architecture historically. 103, 104, 105 Non majors & majors demonstrate their ability through tests, papers, and/or other assignments.  Paper assignments will require them to develop and support an argument.
Learning outcomes for all students—200 level courses 200-level courses introduce students to artistic production within a specific historical period, geographical location (eg. Ancient Rome, Nineteenth-Century Europe) or artistic media (eg. photography, architecture).  These courses constitute the majority of the art history major, although they are also taken by non-majors.  In addition to all of the learning outcomes found in 100-level courses, 200-level courses require the following:
To acquire knowledge of the artistic production of the historical period under investigation Any course from 203-288 Tests, course discussion, papers
To learn the basics of art historical research and writing: how to conduct research, how to formulate a thesis on a work of art, and how to develop an argument using evidence from primary and secondary sources. Any course from 203-288 Research assignments

 

Major interpreters of the topic and the nature of their contributions. Any course from 203-288 Course readings
Demonstrate the ability to read critically primary and secondary sources, and use them to explain works of art and engage with art historical scholarship. Any course from 203-288 Tests, course discussion, papers
Understand the importance of viewing conditions for works of art—display, audience, and response in historical and contemporary contexts. Any course from 203-288 Tests, course discussion, papers, and (occasionally) museum visits
Learning outcomes specific to Art History majors—200 level courses that fulfill period requirements.  Art history majors are required to take courses in at least three broad chronological classifications: before 1400 CE, between 1400-1800 CE, and after 1800 CE.  They must also take at least one course in a non-Western area of art history.  Students are encouraged to develop their own interests through electives.
Students will develop an understanding of artistic production and important approaches to an aspect of art before 1400 CE. 205, 241, 244, 245, 252, 253, 254, 266 Successful completion of at least one of these courses for the major.
Students will develop an understanding of artistic production and important approaches to an aspect of art between 1400-1800 CE 206, 207, 267, 268, 269, 270, 272, 273, 274 Successful completion of at least one of these courses for the major.
Students will have an understanding of artistic production and important approaches to an aspect of art after 1800 CE. Art 231, 232, 233, 234, 259, 281, 282, 284, 285. Successful completion of at least one of these courses for the major.
Students will have an understanding of artistic production and important approaches to an aspect of non-Western art. Art 104, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207 Successful completion of at least one of these courses for the major.
Learning Outcomes Specific to Art History Majors
Acquire functional knowledge of creative processes Any two studio art courses. Successful completion of these courses as determined by instructor.
Knowledge, preparation and skills necessary for careers in fields that intersect with art history. Survey of art history majors 2-5 years after graduation via Office of Career Development.
Learning Outcomes Specific to Art History Majors—seminarsArt history majors are required to take at least two seminar courses: Art 396a-n and Art 394: Issues in Art History.  Art 396 immerses students in a particular topic within the discipline depending on the expertise of the instructor.  Art 394 immerses students in the history of art history and the current state of the field.
Understand the different methodologies, social histories and ideologies thinkers and scholars have employed on the topic. Art 394; Art 396a-n Course readings, discussion, and writing assignments.
Recognize critical approaches in scholarship; be able to summarize and critically respond to arguments. Art 394; Art 396a-n Course readings, discussion, and writing assignments.
Students should understand the historical development of art history as an academic discipline. Art 394 Course readings, discussion, writing assignments, and, at times, a final research project.
Writing and presentation skills Art 394; Art 396a-n Papers and oral presentations, usually including a research paper (c. 15-25 pages).

 

Studio Art Learning Outcomes Courses and Requirements that cover this LO How to access
General learning outcomes for all students
Acquire a basic proficiency within the discipline in terms of material, methodology, terminology and composition. Students also attain a basic level of criticality regarding subject matter, content, and aesthetics. 100 level courses in Sculpture, Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Video/Film, Drawing Students are assessed through group critiques, student exhibitions, student/instructor individual interactions, and course grading.
Build on intro courses, developing an increased technical proficiency and understanding of form/content relationships 200 level courses in Sculpture, Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Video/Film, Drawing Students are assessed through group critiques, student exhibitions, student/instructor individual interactions, and course grading.
Students attain a level of independent inquiry, selecting student-relevant subject matter that communicates intentional content through appropriate means 300 level courses Students are assessed through group critiques, student exhibitions, student/instructor individual interactions, and course grading.
Operate in a safe and independent manner in the artist studio Students are required to view a comprehensive video documenting standard studio safety techniques and sign a form stating they have watched the video.Each professor explains the specific safety concerns in his or her discipline in class An Online Safety test will be required each semester.
Studio Major
Develop awareness of contemporary practice and historical precedence of various artistic mediums Two Art History classes required and studio classroom presentations by professor Successful completion of these courses as determined by instructor and through the ePortfolio
In keeping with the character of the liberal arts institution, students are exposed to a variety of disciplines Requirement to complete a breath of courses within the department Major advising and instructor advising- Students are assessed through group critiques, student exhibitions, student/instructor individual interactions, and course grading.
Build a depth of knowledge within an area Requirement to complete 3 courses in one discipline, and two courses within another Major advising and instructor advising- Students are assessed through group critiques, student exhibitions, student/instructor individual interactions, and grading.
Studio Minor
In keeping with the character of the liberal arts institution, students are exposed to a variety of disciplines and some historical background; 4 studio courses and 1 art history course