Journalism (JOU)

Learning Outcomes for Students Earning a Minor in Journalism

Students who complete a minor in journalism will have developed the following skills and abilities:

General knowledge:

  1. Identify the core principles of journalism: independence from those they cover, especially those in power; an obligation to truth, fairness and balance; an adherence to high ethical standards
  2. Understand the journalistic process and how journalists make decisions
  3. Develop and improve writing skills in specific disciplines
  4. Understand the First Amendment, the principle of Freedom of the Press and the role of the Fourth Estate in American democracy.
  5. Know the differences between assertion and verification as well as evidence and inference in news
  6. Articulate what an independent press means currently and historically
  7. Understand the evolving role and influence of digital and social media in global journalism

Core skills:

  1. Ability to conduct and record information through interviews with news sources.
  2. Ability to court sources and develop compelling story ideas.
  3. Ability to verify information in the news-gathering process.
  4. Ability to communicate clearly, fairly and effectively in a journalistic style (whether news or features, in short or long form) – primarily in writing for print and online mediums, but also through photography, audio and video production.
  5. Ability to apply Associated Press style in writing and editing
  6. Ability to make defensible, ethical decisions in news reporting, editing and publishing

Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes are assessed individually in each class through appropriate measures stated in the course syllabi. All courses emphasize the core principles of journalism: objectivity towards subjects, especially those in power; an obligation to truth, fairness and balance; and an adherence to high ethical standards

The table below maps the minor’s learning outcomes against  courses offered in the minor. Assessment will be handled in two ways depending on the level of published work the student  has produced  outside of class. Students with extensive published work from campus organizations (The Old Gold and Black, Wake TV, Wake Radio, Her Campus, etc.) and/or professional internships, will present a portfolio of their work for review. Students with little or no published work will be asked to complete an exit interview prior to graduation.

 

Learning Outcomes for Minor Courses that cover this learning outcome
 

  • Understand the journalistic process and how journalists make decisions
  • Ability to conduct and record information through interviews with news sources.
  • Ability to court sources and develop compelling story ideas.
  • Ability to verify information in the news-gathering process.
  • Ability to communicate clearly, fairly and effectively in a journalistic style (whether news or features, in short or long form) – primarily in writing for print and online mediums, but also through photography, audio and video production.
  • Ability to make defensible, ethical decisions in news reporting, editing and publishing.

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Journalism (JOU 270), a required gateway course for the minor. All other writing courses in the minor reinforce these principles and practices: Niche Reporting (JOU 276);  Beat Reporting (JOU 282); Magazine Writing (JOU 284);  Niche Feature Writing (JOU 285); and Internship (JOU 298).

 

Ability to apply Associated Press style in writing and editing

 

 

Editing (JOU 272) places a semester-long emphasis on the importance of AP Style. All other writing courses also provide a framework for using AP Style in assignments.

 

 

Develop and improve writing skills in specific disciplines

 

 

The newly designed JOU curriculum allows for more opportunities for specialization through  Niche Reporting (JOU 276; sports, community, business)  Niche Feature Writing (JOU 285), and Internship (JOU 298).

 

  • Understand the First Amendment, the principle of Freedom of the Press and the role of the Fourth Estate in American democracy.
  • Know the differences between assertion and verification as well as evidence and inference in news.
  • Articulate what an independent press means currently and historically.

 

 

News Literacy (JOU 278), a required non-writing course,  emphasizes the broad principles of journalism and what sets it apart from social media, individual blogs, and so-called citizen journalism. It also sets the profession in an historical context.

 

 

Understand the evolving role and influence of digital and social media in global journalism.

 

The Interactive Digital Media course (JOU 289). All writing courses include aspects of digital and social media.