Displaying all posts for Climate

NY Times: Galapagos Treasure under Threat

by April 28, 2014
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The New York Times recently featured Dr. David Anderson’s work in the Galapagos on the Blue-footed boobies. The number of boobies, known for their brightly colored feet and signature mating dance, has dropped by 50 percent in the last 20 years, according to a paper published in the journal Avian Read more »

Drones to Add Flying Eye on Our Ecosystem

by February 12, 2014
WFU graduate student Max Messinger and professor Miles Silman show their aircraft used for monitoring the forest canopy

From the Charlotte Observer, Feb 9, 2014 by Reid Creager Sure, it resembles a spider on steroids. But a recently developed flying robot – soon to hover over the Peruvian cloud forest for the first time – has potential benefits for everyone. About a year and a half ago, a Read more »

From One Forest to Another

by December 18, 2013
Max Messinger, graduate student and expert in research drones flys his "robot" on the WFU practice field

Several news agencies have published stories recently about unique research conducted by Max Messinger and Miles Silman in the Department of Biology. Dr. Silman’s group is making use of “flying robots” to photograph and measure data from the forest canopy.  Messinger is the local expert on how to turn these Read more »

Silman: How Is Climate Change Affecting Tropical Forests?

by October 1, 2013
Image for Silman: How Is Climate Change Affecting Tropical Forests?

Biology Professor, Miles Silman was featured by WUNC Public Radio science correspondent Justin Catanoso in his feature titled “How Is Climate Change Affecting Tropical Forests?” Silman is a pilot of sorts for the cause of preserving tropical forests. And he clings to such dark forms of hope in the face Read more »

Silman’s Work Featured in National Geographic

by
Miles Silman, Ran and Frank Bell Jr. Faculty Fellow

Rain Forest Plants Race to Outrun Global Warming Tropical plants are migrating due to climate change, but can they move fast enough? Justin Catanoso for National Geographic Published September 15, 2013 From a 13,000-foot peak of the Andes Mountains in southern Peru, gazing east over the dense rain forests of Read more »

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