Displaying all posts for Gloria Muday

Red Plus Red Equals Green?

by September 13, 2013
Students examining a DNA extraction

The Winston Salem Journal recognized Department of Biology outreach efforts directed by Gloria Muday and Carole Browne engaging WFU undergraduates to become teachers of science classes in the local schools.  WFU students Kathleen Quigley (PhD. candidate) and Ashlyn Whitlock (senior) were also interviewed. Click the link to read the article Read more »

Teaching with Tomatoes

by November 2, 2012
Dr. Gloria Muday teaching genetics to high school students

Peter Chawaga of the Wake Forest News Service recently published an article about the outreach efforts of Drs. Gloria Muday and Carole Browne.  These professors along with the support of graduate and undergraduate students execute an outreach program to the public schools.  The focus of this program is to teach Read more »

Muday Receives Funding from the National Science Foundation for Work on Arabadopsis

by March 18, 2012
Gloria Muday, Professor of Biology

Congratulations to Gloria K. Muday, professor of biology, whose proposal entitled “Arabidopsis 2010 Project Collaborative Research: Modeling Biological Networks in Arabidopsis through Integration of Genomic, Proteomic, and Metabolomic Data” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Green Fruit, Deep Roots

by September 22, 2011
495x300.20090819.muday_3

Wake Forest University’s Campus Garden overflows with tomatoes. But, with names like Never Ripe and Green Ripe, many will never be the rich, red orbs you’d slice up for sandwiches. These tomatoes – mutant varieties bred for research – will help Gloria K. Muday, Ph.D., a professor of biology, determine Read more »

Mutant Green Tomatoes

by October 6, 2010
tomatoes

    TECHJOURNAL.ORG recently published and article entitled “Mutant green tomatoes show research is key to tougher crops” which focuses on the work of Biology professor Gloria Muday’s laboratory. Excerpt: As fat summer tomatoes dangle in profusion from vines in gardens and farms across the country, researchers at Wake Forest University Read more »