Child Abuse in Birds?

by September 29, 2011
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WFU News Service, August 2011 For one species of seabird in the Galápagos, the child abuse “cycle of violence” found in humans plays out in the wild. The new study of Nazca boobies by Wake Forest University researchers provides the first evidence from the animal world showing those who are Read more »

Conner Honored for Biology and Entrepreneurship

by September 22, 2011
William Conner, Farr Professor of Innovation, Creativity, and Entrepreneurship

Professor of Biology William E. Conner has been named the first David and Lelia Farr Professor of Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship. The chair was established by David (’77) and Lelia (’77) Farr of St. Louis, Mo., to recognize Conner and his work with the Wake Forest Program in Innovation, Creativity Read more »

Art and Biology: What Do You See in the Andes?

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Famous painting is ‘reading’ assignment for first-year students More than 1,200 first-year students and their advisers visited Reynolda House Museum of American Art on Sunday as part of this year’s summer “reading” project. Rather than reading an assigned book before they arrived on campus, new students instead studied a painting, Read more »

Green Fruit, Deep Roots

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Wake Forest University’s Campus Garden overflows with tomatoes. But, with names like Never Ripe and Green Ripe, many will never be the rich, red orbs you’d slice up for sandwiches. These tomatoes – mutant varieties bred for research – will help Gloria K. Muday, Ph.D., a professor of biology, determine Read more »

Location, Location, Location

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Arts & Sciences Faculty Portraits 2011

Just how many plant species are threatened by land development in the Amazon? Biology Professor Miles Silman and research Ken Feeley published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that the degree to which plant species are threatened is highly location dependent.  The article in Read more »

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