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The Department of Biology at Wake Forest is a diverse team of scientists and students investigating the processes of life at all levels. While many other research universities contain specialized and isolated departments based on biological sub-disciplines, we value the interdisciplinary atmosphere and advances that a full-spectrum department promotes.  The full-time faculty currently stands at 22 professors, and the student body includes 35 Master’s and Ph.D. students and approximately 200 undergraduate Biology majors.  Research is central to our mission, with almost all majors joining faculty and graduate students outside of class in our laboratories and field sites.  Much of our research is supported by federal grants, permitting ambitious approaches that prepare graduate and undergraduate students for careers in academics, medicine, biotech,  and other areas.

What do you see in the Andes?

by September 22, 2011
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Famous painting is ‘reading’ assignment for first-year students More than 1,200 first-year students and their advisers visited Reynolda House Museum of American Art on Sunday as part of this year’s summer “reading” project. Rather than reading an assigned book before they arrived on campus, new students instead studied a painting, Read more »

Green fruit, deep roots

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Wake Forest University’s Campus Garden overflows with tomatoes. But, with names like Never Ripe and Green Ripe, many will never be the rich, red orbs you’d slice up for sandwiches. These tomatoes – mutant varieties bred for research – will help Gloria K. Muday, Ph.D., a professor of biology, determine Read more »

Location, Location, Location

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Arts & Sciences Faculty Portraits 2011

Just how many plant species are threatened by land development in the Amazon? Biology Professor Miles Silman and research Ken Feeley published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that the degree to which plant species are threatened is highly location dependent.  The article in Read more »

Tropical plant collections and predicting climate impacts

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Miles Silman, Ran and Frank Bell Jr. Faculty Fellow

Missing Pieces David Malakoff | January 27, 2011  | Conservation Magazine Sparse tropical plant collections complicate efforts to predict climate impacts Want to know if that Amazonian orchid you love so much is likely to survive a warming climate? Don’t hold your breath. Efforts to create models that predict how Read more »

Proposals funded: William Smith

by September 18, 2011

Congratulations to Bill Smith, whose proposal entitled “Collaborative RUI Proposal: Effects of Contrasting Cloud Regimes on Plant Carbon/Water Relations at Treeline” has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).