The Catalog

Courses Offered

 

Greek

111, 112. Elementary Greek. (4h, 4h) Introduction to the language; provides a foundation for reading the ancient authors.

153. Intermediate Greek. (3h) Review of grammar; readings in classical authors. P—Greek 112 or equivalent.

211. Plato. (3h) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. P—Greek 153 or equivalent.

212. Homer. (3h) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. P—Greek 153 or equivalent.

221. Greek Readings. (1.5h or 3h) Designed to meet individual needs and interests. Course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. P—POI.

225. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) Intensive work in morphology and syntax,
with practice in composition and stylistic analysis of selected readings. P—Greek 200-level
or equivalent.

231. The Greek New Testament. (3h) Selections from the Greek New Testament. P—Greek
200-level or equivalent.

241. Greek Tragedy. (3h) Close study of a selected tragedy or tragedies. Includes consideration of the origin and history of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of other tragedies in English translation. Seminar. P—Greek 200-level or equivalent.

242. Greek Comedy. (3h) Close study of a selected comedy or comedies of Aristophanes. Includes consideration of the origin and history of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of other comedies in English translation. Seminar. P—Greek 200-level or equivalent.

291, 292. Honors in Greek. (1.5h, 1.5h) Directed research for honors paper. P—POD.

 

 

Latin

 

111, 112. Elementary Latin. (3h, 3h) Introduction to the language; provides a foundation for reading in the ancient authors.

113. Intensive Elementary Latin. (4h) Introduction to the language; covers the material of Latin 111 and 112 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 111 or 112.

120. Reading Medieval Latin. (1.5h, 3h) Introduction to post-classical Latin with readings in selected works from late antiquity and the Middle Ages. P—Latin 112 or equivalent.

153. Intermediate Latin. (4h) Review of grammar and selected introductory readings. P—Latin 112 or 113.

211. Introduction to Latin Poetry. (3h) Readings from selected poets mainly of the late Republic and early Empire, with an introduction to literary criticism. P—Latin 153 or equivalent.

212. Introduction to Latin Prose. (3h) Readings primarily from the works of Cicero, with attention to their artistry and historical context. P—Latin 153 or equivalent.

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (3h) Interpretation and evaluation of lyric poetry through readings
from the poems of Catullus and Horace. P—Latin 153 or equivalent.

218. Roman Epic Poetry. (3h) Readings in the epics of Virgil and Ovid, with attention to their position in the epic tradition. P—Latin 153 or equivalent.

221. Roman Historians. (3h) Readings in the works of Sallust, Livy, or Tacitus, with attention to the historical background and the norms of ancient historiography. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

225. Roman Epistolography. (3h) Selected readings from the correspondence of Cicero and Pliny the Younger and the verse epistles of Horace and Ovid. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

226. Roman Comedy. (3h) Readings of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, with a study of the traditions of comedy and dramatic techniques. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

231. Roman Elegy. (3h) Readings from the poems of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, with study of the elegiac tradition. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

241. Roman Satire. (3h) Selected readings from Horace and Juvenal, with attention to the origin and development of hexameter satire. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

243. Latin Readings. (1.5h or 3h) Designed to meet individual needs and interests. Course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. P—POI.

250. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (3h) Intensive work in morphology and syntax, with practice in composition and stylistic analysis of selected readings. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

260. Seminar in Latin Poetry. (3h) Advanced study in selected authors and topics. A research paper is required. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

280. Seminar in Latin Prose. (3h) Advanced study in selected authors and topics. A research paper is required. P—Latin 200-level or equivalent.

291, 292. Honors in Latin. (1.5h, 1.5h) Directed research for the honors paper. P—POD.

 

 

Classics

 

151. Ethics in Greece and Rome. (1.5h) Reading and discussion of Aristotle’s Ethics and Cicero’s On Moral Duties, with attention to our own ethical dilemmas. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required.

252. Women in Antiquity. (3h) Explores the place of women in Greek and Roman society through the study of a wide range of primary sources, literary and non-literary. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. (CD)

255. Classical Epic: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid. (3h) Study of the three principal epic poems from ancient Greece and Rome. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. (D)

259. Virgil and His English Legacy. (3h) Study of Virgil’s Eclogues, Georgics, and selected passages of the Aeneid, and their influence on English literature, using translations and original works by writers of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, including Spenser, Marlowe, Milton, Dryden, and Pope. Knowledge of Latin is not required. Also listed as ENG 319.

261. Greek Myth. (3h) Consideration, principally through close study of selected literary works, of Greek myth in its various forms, primary (archaic and classical periods) and secondary (Hellenistic and Roman); the course also considers Greek myth’s afterlife in the modern period. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. (D)

263. Greek Tragedy. (3h) Study of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. (D)

264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (3h) Representative works of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the origins and development of comedy. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. (D)

274. Special Topics. (1.5-3h) Special topics in Classical literature and culture. May be repeated for credit.

275. The Age of Pericles. (3h) Study of Greek culture in all its aspects during the fifth century. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. (CD)

276. The Age of Augustus. (3h) Study of Roman culture in all its aspects during the early Empire. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. (CD)

281. Seminar in Classical Studies. (3h) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their
choice. A knowledge of Greek and Latin languages is not required. May be repeated for credit.
P—Any CLA 200-level course.

288. Individual Study. (1.5h or 3h) Course may be repeated for a total of six hours. P—POI.

291, 292. Honors in Classical Studies. (1.5h, 1.5h) Directed research for the honors paper. P—POD.