Come socialize, play, and compete with Faculty.Trivia Night Flyer Wb
At Shorty’s on the Wake Forest campus
Wed., Nov. 18 from 7-9 p.m.

Rules: No more than 6 on a team. Teams must include at least one professor and one student. Start recruiting! For more information on participating, contact hogansa@wfu.edu.
 

Emma Skeels, an English major, will present on her research completed in London made possible through a Richter Scholarship.

This presentation will take place in Tribble Hall, room C216 on Monday, November 2, 2015 at 3:30 p.m.

For additional information, contact english@wfu.edu.

Please join us for a literary reading with writers Renee Gladman and Joanna Howard on Thursday, Nov. 5, at 4:30 p.m. in DeTamble Auditorium in Tribble Hall at Wake Forest University. The reading is free and open to the public. For more information, see the Dillon Johnston Writers Reading Series.

Renee Gladman and Joanna Howard Poster

 

12/1/11 1:33:51 AM -- Boston, Massachusetts CAS Assistant Professor of English Carrie Preston studies the highly traditional form of Hoh Japanese dance as part of her research on Yeats' dance plays. Preston is pictured in dance attire from Japan including footwear (tabi) and a fan. Photo by Melody Komyerov for Boston University Photography CAS Assistant Professor of English at Boston University, Carrie Preston studies the highly traditional form of Noh Japanese dance as part of her research on Yeats’ dance plays. Preston is pictured in dance attire from Japan including footwear (tabi) and a fan. Photo by Melody Komyerov for Boston University Photography

Learning to Kneel for Hagoromo: Ezra Pound as Noh Student
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 4:30 p.m.
in DeTamble Auditorium, Tribble Hall

Preston, associate professor at Boston University and director of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, is a literature and dance/performance scholar whose research and teaching interests include modernist literature, performance and dance, feminist and queer theory, and transnational and postcolonial studies.

Her book, Modernism’s Mythic Pose: Gender, Genre, Solo Performance, was released in Oxford University Press’s Modernist Literature and Culture Series in 2011 and received the De La Torre Bueno Prize in dance studies. The book examines modernist solos in modern dance, film, and poetic recitation and the subjectivities they construct.

Sponsored by the Wake Forest University English Department Dean Family Fund, IPLACe, and the Wake Forest University Humanities Institute, with support made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This free event is open to the campus community and general public.
For more information: english@wfu.edu or 336.758.5383.
Follow: facebook.com/wfuenglish and twitter.com/wfuenglish

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

The Dillon Johnston Writers Reading Series in the Department of English is pleased to be sponsoring a poetry reading with poet and critic MICHAEL LEONG on Thursday, Oct. 1 at 4:30 p.m. in DeTamble Auditorium, Tribble Hall. The event is free and open to the entire campus community and the public. For more information, see the Dillon Johnston Writers Reading Series.

Michael Leong Poster

The Graduate Program in English
presents a talk by Nathan Suhr-Sytsma

Transnational Lines, or Poetry in the Era of Decolonization

Since Chinua Achebe appropriated the phrase Things Fall Apart from W. B. Yeats, African literature has often been framed as a response to earlier British and Irish texts. This talk takes up Christopher Okigbo’s “Lament of the Masks,” a poem that strikingly addresses Yeats in the idiom of a Yoruba oríkì or praise-song, in order to propose a new approach to reading twentieth-century anglophone poetry.

Tuesday, April 14 at 11:00 a.m.
Tribble Hall, Room A108

Wednesday, March 18 at 4:30 p.m.
Tribble Hall, Room C216
Reception follows in Ammons Lounge

A Lecture by Lauren Berlant
Sponsored by the Dean Family Fund

Living in Ellipsis: On Biopolitics and the Attachment to Life

Dr. Lauren Berlant, a George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English at the University of Chicago, will discuss “being in life without wanting the world” while considering works by Claudia Rankine (Don’t Let Me Be Lonely), the novel and film A Single Man (Christopher Isherwood, 1964; Tom Ford, 2009), and works by Harryette Mullen (Sleeping with the Dictionary). The talk will examine the aesthetics and a subjectivity shaped on one side by suicide and on the other by a life drive.

 

Additional information.

Made possible by the Dean Family fund.

Join us for a reading by Bhanu Kapil in the Hanes Art Gallery at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, January 28.

Kapil teaches at Naropa University and in Goddard College’s M.F.A. program.

She is the author of five books of poetry/prose: Ban en Banlieu (forthcoming Dec. 2014, Nightboat Books), Schizophrene (Nightboat Books, 2011), humanimal [a project for futhre children] (Kelsey Street Press, 2009), Incubation: a space for monsters (Leon Works, 2006), and The Vertical Interrogation of Strangers (Kelsey Street Press, 2001).

Sponsored by the Dillon Johnston Writers Reading Series.

Additional information.


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English Department
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Winston Salem, NC 27109
336-758-5383 | english@wfu.edu
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