Learning to Kneel for Hagoromo: Ezra Pound as Noh Student

12/1/11 1:33:51 AM -- Boston, Massachusetts CAS Assistant Professor of English Carrie Preston studies the highly traditional form of Hoh Japanese dance as part of her research on Yeats' dance plays. Preston is pictured in dance attire from Japan including footwear (tabi) and a fan. Photo by Melody Komyerov for Boston University PhotographyCAS Assistant Professor of English at Boston University, Carrie Preston studies the highly traditional form of Noh Japanese dance as part of her research on Yeats’ dance plays. Preston is pictured in dance attire from Japan including footwear (tabi) and a fan. Photo by Melody Komyerov for Boston University Photography

Learning to Kneel for Hagoromo: Ezra Pound as Noh Student
Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 4:30 p.m.
in DeTamble Auditorium, Tribble Hall

Preston, associate professor at Boston University and director of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, is a literature and dance/performance scholar whose research and teaching interests include modernist literature, performance and dance, feminist and queer theory, and transnational and postcolonial studies.

Her book, Modernism’s Mythic Pose: Gender, Genre, Solo Performance, was released in Oxford University Press’s Modernist Literature and Culture Series in 2011 and received the De La Torre Bueno Prize in dance studies. The book examines modernist solos in modern dance, film, and poetic recitation and the subjectivities they construct.

Sponsored by the Wake Forest University English Department Dean Family Fund, IPLACe, and the Wake Forest University Humanities Institute, with support made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

This free event is open to the campus community and general public.
For more information: english@wfu.edu or 336.758.5383.
Follow: facebook.com/wfuenglish and twitter.com/wfuenglish

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

 

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