Courses

medieval pattern

Anglo-saxon artCourses may be chosen from the following list. Additional elective courses are also offered on a regular basis. The program coordinators maintain a complete list of all approved elective courses. For course descriptions, see the relevant department’s listings.

Course offerings for the Medieval Studies Minor

ART

252. Romanesque Art. (3h)

253. The Gothic Cathedral. (3h)

254. Luxury Arts in the Middle Ages. (3h)

267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (3h)

396. Art History Seminar: b. Medieval Art. (1.5h, 3h)

ENG

305. Old English Language and Literature. (3h)

310. The Medieval World. (3h)

311. The Legend of Arthur. (3h)

312. Medieval Poetry. (3h)

315. Chaucer. (3h)

320. British Drama to 1642. (3h)

FRH

370. Seminar in French and Francophone Studies. (3h) (Periodically offered in Medieval Studies)

GER

349. German Literature before 1700. (3h)

HST

206. The Early Middle Ages. (3h)

207. The High Middle Ages Through the Renaissance. (3h)

242. The Middle East before 1500. (3h)

311. Special Topics in History. (when topic is Jerusalem) (3h)

HMN

320. Perspectives on the Middle Ages. (3h)

361. Dante I. (1.5h)

362. Dante II. (1.5h)

PHI

237. Medieval Philosophy. (3h)

POL

274. Religion and Politics in Medieval Thought. (3h)

REL

367. The Mystics of the Church. (3h)

372. History of Christian Thought (3h)

SPN

331. Medieval Spain: A Cultural and Literary Perspective. (3h)

344: “The Debate about Woman in Late Medieval Spain” (3 hr)

345: “Medieval Pilgrimages” (3 hr)

THE

310. History of Western Theatre I (Beginnings to 1642). (3h)

Course Offerings for the Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate Program in Medieval Studies

Art

696** Art History Seminar: b. Medieval Art (1.5h, 3h) – Offered by members of faculty or visiting faculty on topics of their choice.

252* Romanesque Art (3h) – Art and architecture from the Carolingian Renaissance through the twelfth century.

253* The Gothic Cathedral (3h) – The character and evolution of Gothic cathedrals and the sculpture, stained glass, metal works, and paintings designed for them.

254* Luxury Arts in the Middle Ages (3h) – Medieval illuminated manuscripts and precious objects made of gold, silver, ivory, enamel, and other luxury materials.

267* Early Italian Renaissance Art (3h) – The development of the art and architecture of Italy from around 1300 to the late 16th century.

English

710 Studies in Medieval Literature: Time, History and the Body in Early Medieval Narrative

710 Studies in Medieval Literature: Early Medieval Narrative

711 Studies in Arthurian Legend

712 Studies in Medieval Poetry

715 Chaucer and His Age

605 Old English Language and Literature (3h) – An introduction to the Old English language and a study of the historical and cultural background of Old English literature, including Anglo-Saxon and Viking art, runes, and Scandinavian mythology. Readings from Beowulf and selected poems and prose.

607 Dante I (1.5h) – A study of the Vita Nuova as apprenticeship to the Divina Commedia, and of the first half of the Divina Commedia as epic, prophecy, autobiography, and poetry, relating to antiquity, Christianity, Dante’s European present (the birth of modern languages and new intellectual and poetic forms), and Dante’s own afterlife in the West.

608 Dante II (1.5h) A study of the second half of the Divina Commedia as epic, prophecy, autobiography, and poetry, relating to antiquity, Christianity, Dante’s European present (the birth of modern languages and new intellectual and poetic forms), and Dante’s own afterlife in the West. P-Humanities 361 or permission of instructor.

610 The Medieval World (3h) – Through the reading of primary texts, this course will examine theological, philosophical, and cultural assumptions of the Middle Ages. Topics may include Christian providential history, drama, devotional literature, the Franciscan controversy, and domestic life.

611 The Legend of Arthur (3h) – The origin and development of the Arthurian legend in Britain and France, with an emphasis on the works of Chrėtien de Troyes and Sir Thomas Malory.

612 Medieval Poetry (3h) – The origin and development of poetic genres and lyric forms and narrative styles of Medieval literature, including Continental works and works in Middle English.

613 – The Roots of Song: Words and Music in the Middle Ages [3 h) – A team taught course devoted to examining the development of song and poetry (poetry set to music) in the Middle Ages up until the Early Modern period; included is a study of the evolution of poetic and musical genres and styles that emerge from Gregorian chant, the rise and foundation of musical notation [by looking at medieval music manuscripts), and learning about song from both the literary and musical perspectives.

615 Chaucer (3h) – Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. Literary, social, historical, artistic, religious, and philosophical contexts.

620 British Drama to 1642 (3h) – British drama from its beginning to 1642, exclusive of Shakespeare. Representative cycle plays, moralities, Elizabethan and Jacobean tragedies, comedies and tragicomedies.

French

630** Seminar in Medieval Studies (3h)—An examination and study of literary, social, and cultural themes. Topics may include: piety and religious satire; alterity and unity; the literary construction of collective and personal identity; the conception of women and the act of writing; Arthurian literature. P-French 215, 216, or 217 or permission of instructor.

670** Seminar in French and Francophone Studies. (3h) (Periodically offered in Medieval Studies)

 

* Courses with a 200-level designation: we are working with the professors of these courses to redesign them and offer them on the 600 level.

** These courses are now taught as 300-level courses; we are working with the faculty that teach them and their department chairs to complete the procedural changes necessary to designate them as 600-level courses.


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