Beth Hopkins

Adjunct Assistant Professor Muriel Beth Hopkins
US Legal History
B-116 Tribble Hall;
e-mail: hopkinmn@wfu.edu

 

BioBeth Norbrey Hopkins is a Deacon undergrad who has enjoyed more than a ten- year career of adjunct teaching at Wake Forest.  The current history course “Race, and the Courts” is the synthesis of historical analysis and Ms. Hopkins’ distinguished career of public interest service. Recently, the WFU law school appointed her to serve as the Director of Outreach and professor of practice. After graduating from William & Mary’s Marshall-Wythe School of Law, she  worked as an associate at  Hill, Tucker, and Marsh  in Richmond, Virginia, and then served  as an assistant attorney general for the Commonwealth of Virginia,  and later as an assistant United States attorney in Virginia and Louisiana. Prior to her current position, Attorney Hopkins served as associate legal counsel in the Wake Forest legal affairs department.  In addition to her responsibilities at Wake Forest, Attorney Hopkins remains active as a member of several boards that directly impact the community.

CVEducation:
B.A.      Wake Forest University 1973
J.D.      Marshall-Wythe School of Law 1977

Academic Appointments:
Wake Forest University.  Senior Lecturer (2007-present); Adjunct Associate Professor 2001-2007; Visiting Lecturer (1999-2001)

Administrative Appointments:
Wake Forest University.  Director of Outreach (2010-present)

Click here for the complete CV.

PublicationsContributed a chapter to History of Wake Forest University, Volume V, 1967-1983.

For a complete list of publications, click CV.

Courses
  • HST 358 Race and the Courts
    This course examines the impact of state and federal court cases upon the evolution of race relations in the U.S.  Beginning with Dred Scott, the historical context of each case is placed in juxtaposition to the social and political realities for the given time periods. Case law, scholarly articles, as well as the Supreme Court Digest provide a foundation for analyzing government intervention, inaction, and creative interpretation.

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