Penny Sinanoglou

 

Assistant Professor Penny Sinanoglou

B-2 Tribble Hall, 758-5522
e-mail: sinanopj@wfu.edu

 

 

BioPenny Sinanoglou received her Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, and her B.A. in History and Middle Eastern and Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University. She has published on twentieth-century British policy-making in the Middle East, and works more broadly on questions of empire, nationalism, ethnic identity, and decolonization.

CVEducation:
B.A. Columbia University 2000
Ph.D. Harvard University 2008

Academic Appointments:
Harvard University 2008-2010
Princeton University 2010-11
Wake Forest University 2011-

Click here for complete CV.

Publications

  • “The Peel Commission and Partition, 1936-1938,” in Britain, Palestine and Empire: The Mandate Years, Rory Miller, ed. (Ashgate, 2010), 119-140.
  • “British Plans for the Partition of Palestine, 1929-1938,” The Historical Journal 52 (2009): 131–52.

For a complete list of publications, click CV

CoursesHST 102: Europe and the World in the Modern Era
This course offers an introduction to the history of Europe from the Old Regime to the early twenty-first century. We explore social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual history, engaging with themes such as the structures and functions of government and society, the role of international relations in shaping domestic, regional and global politics, the relationship of people to modes of production and consumption, the influence of ideas on political, economic and social life, and the position of individuals in relation to communities and states.

Using both a textbook, which looks back from a distance and pulls together a coherent narrative, and primary sources, which are produced in particular historical moments, we track, analyze and debate that central concern of historical scholarship: change over time.

FYS 100: Explorers, Travelers, Tourists: Europeans Abroad in the Age of Empires
From fifteenth-century explorers who set foot in the New World to the masses of tourists taking EasyJet holidays for weekends in North Africa, European travelers have had a tremendous impact on the development of a truly global world that is interconnected environmentally, politically, economically and culturally. This seminar focuses on Europeans traveling abroad from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries and asks how travel changed over this period, and what its impact was on the travelers themselves, on European life at home, and on the people with whom the travelers came in contact.

HST 309: European International Relations Since World War I
This course covers European international relations, broadly construed, from the lead-up to the First World War through to the fallout from the Euro crisis. The course takes seriously the notion that international relations are more than just diplomatic relations; course readings and class discussions cover the roles of state and non-state actors, ideologies, economies, and socio-cultural forces in international relations. Although the course is arranged chronologically, it also seeks to make thematic connections, focusing in particular on the role played in international relations by the collapse of empires (ranging from the multi-ethnic, multi-lingual Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, and Soviet empires to the British and French colonial ones); domestic politics; popular mobilization on both the right and left; challenges to the nation-state in the form of transnational ideologies; sovereignty in both new and old forms; and currency, trade, investment, and financial settlements.

HST 390: Decolonization in the Twentieth Century
At the start of World War II in 1939, approximately one-third of the world’s population lived under European colonial rule. By the end of the twentieth century, that number had dropped to less than one percent. This research seminar takes as its focus the process of decolonization in the twentieth century, comparing and contrasting the end of European empires in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. Themes addressed in the readings include the roles of violent and non-violent resistance, European domestic politics and international agreements, cultural imperialism and post-colonial immigration. We ask why decolonization was sudden in some places and protracted in others, consensual and relatively peaceful in certain territories and explosively divisive in others. The course includes an examination of the legacy of empire and decolonization in the contemporary world, and of the persistence of imperialism in the twenty-first century.

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