Past Course Schedule

Spring 2014

100 Level Courses

HST 101A and 101B. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 and 12:30-1:45. B-117. Hughes. (in a Mediterranean context):  Human beings have faced certain perennial problems as they tried to live their lives in complex societies.  We’ll explore their efforts to come to grips with these problems by focusing on a historically important but culturally diverse area of the world, the Mediterranean basin and its outliers, over an extended period of time.  Some of the problems that will concern us in the course are: the nature of divinity and people’s relationship to the divine; the nature of evil; the nature and sources of human knowledge; the organization and legitimation of political power.  Two particular emphases will be environmental history (why did the Mediterranean remain a center of world power for 4500 years—and then become a backwater?) and cultural development and interaction (why and how did human groups develop different cultures within similar, neighboring environments, and how did their interaction with one another affect their development?).  Americans are, perforce, cultural heirs to this part of the world, and a study of its development should give you some understanding of how the culture you live in—and some of your own attitudes and values—came to be. (CD, D)

HST 101C and 101D. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). TR 8:00-9:15 and 9:30-10:45. A-102. Williams. At light speed (in one class period) we will traverse the prehistory of our species and then set about a more intensive review of the next 5200 years (3500 B.C.E to 1700 C.E). Our journey will carry us from Sumeria and the appearance of that form of culture historians call civilization to the eve of industrialization and political revolution in Western Europe.  While examining the the communal structures, achievements, tribulations, and transformations of peoples who, for the most part, spoke Indo-European languages and who, from their origins somewhere north of the Caucasus, came to control not only Europe, but the Americas and the whole of northern Asia, we will try to determine what sense it makes to speak of the tangible and intangible worlds they made as a single civilization and on what bases we might distinguish this civilization from others that appeared elsewhere. (CD, D)

HST 102A. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). TR 12:30-1:45. A-102. Thomas. This course examines Europe’s tumultuous relationship with the world over the past three centuries.  It begins with a time of increasing European ascendancy during which recently empowered bureaucratized and militarized European states projected their influence to the far reaches of the globe.  In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, political, economic, and intellectual revolutions emanating largely from within Europe enhanced this ascendancy, facilitating economic and political mastery over other regions.  Indeed, by the late nineteenth century many of the world’s inhabitants must have shared the view of one African that his continent faced “a plague of Europeans.”  In the twentieth century, however, world wars and disastrous political and economic developments undercut Europe’s advantages while other areas of the globe adjusted, innovated, caught up, and surpassed their erstwhile rivals.  This course will illuminate how civilizations interact with one another, at times with mutual benefit, at times with mutual disadvantage.  It should also shed light on how people react to outsiders who are either less powerful, more powerful, or simply different. (CD, D)

HST 103C and 103D. World Civilizations to 1500 (3h).  MWF 9:00-9:50 A-103 and 11:00-11:50.  A-102.  Zhang.  This course surveys the evolution of world civilizations from around 3500 BCE to 1500 CE.  Within a roughly chronological framework, it seeks to highlight the broad patterns of development among major human communities, especially those on the Eurasian continent and in Africa, with respect to their political and social institutions, economic life, values, intellectual traditions and religious beliefs. (CD, D)

HST 106A Medieval World Civilizations (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-103. O’Connell. This course provides an overview of world civilizations in the period generally understood as “medieval”—that is, from approximately 600 to 1600 C.E. The concept of a medieval, or middle, period in history originally came from European history, referring to the time between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance, or to a rebirth of classical knowledge. One of the questions of this course is to examine cultures and societies in east Asia, India, Africa, and the Americas as well as Europe during the same time frame and to ask if there is such a thing as a “medieval” world history. Are there patterns, transformations, and developments common to all these societies in the medieval period? What characteristics do these widely differing cultures and geographic areas share, and where do they differ? (CD, D)

HST 107A and 107B. Middle East & The World (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50 and 12:00-12:50. A-103.  Wilkins. Examines in its global context the history of the Middle East region from the inception of Islam in the seventh century to the twentieth century.  Combines an introduction to Islamic civilization it its central lands with a close study of its interaction with other societies. (CD, D)

HST 108A and 108B. The Americas and the World (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 and 11:00-12:15. A-103. Coates. This course explores the history of the Western hemisphere in global perspective since 1500. This includes the story of U.S. domination and Latin American resistance, especially in the 19th and 20th centuries. But we will focus even more on how global forces have shaped the development of North, South, and Central America and the Caribbean. How have political, economic, and cultural developments enhanced or inhibited the ability of individuals and groups to shape their own lives? Topics covered include the “first globalization” of goods, germs, and peoples; slavery, resistance, and emancipation; colonialism and independence; the industrial, market, and transportation revolutions; international migration; war (Cold, Civil and otherwise); the global 1960s; and the histories of development and neoliberalism. We will also think about how the very terms that people use to describe the region (e.g., the “New World,” the “Americas,” “Latin” or “Hispanic” America, etc.) reflect and make possible particular national goals and political projects. (CD, D)

HST 108C, 108D and 108F. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50, 10:00-10:50 and 1:00-1:50. A-102. Roberts. This course explores large-scale social, political, and economic trends that connected North and South America to the rest of the globe as well as the lives of individuals who experienced those changes. The course uses readings such as scholarly texts, historical documents, autobiographies, and other first-person accounts to examine how people understood and interpreted imperial expansions, slavery, revolutions, political power, work, human difference, environments, and the movements of ideas and materials. Ultimately, this course investigates the tensions between broad changes over time and individuals’ stories about those changes. Such an approach illuminates the diverse ways in which people viewed their world, their singular and collective power to change it, and the larger structures of power that limited or supported their actions. (CD, D)

HST 108E. The Americas and the World (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-102. Yarfitz. This course examines North, Central and South America in global perspectives from premodern times to the present with particular attention to political, economic, social, and cultural developments and interactions. (CD, D)

HST 109A and 109B. Asia and the World (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 and 11:00-12:15. A-208. Rahman. Primarily focusing on South, Southeast, and East Asia, the aim of this course is to appreciate the diversity within Asia and understand the history of this continent as linked with global history. Although we cover different time periods, our focus largely remains confined to the last five centuries. What are the different societies and traditions within Asia? What have been their contributions? What historical incidents and trajectories have linked Asia to the rest of the world? Such questions are considered to explore the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Asia and its interactions with the outside world. Specific topics include different religious and cultural traditions, imperialism, global trade and commerce, the Indian Ocean, cross-cultural interactions, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization movements. (CD, D)

HST 111A and 111B. Ancient World Civilizations (3h). WF 9:30-10:45 and 11:00-12:15. A-208. Lerner. Explores ancient civilizations from the perspective that each civilization is a reflection of local circumstances and the distinctive worldview that shaped its institutions to become a complex, state-organized society. (CD, D)

 

200 Level Courses

HST 217. France to 1774 (3h). WF 9:30-10:45. B-116. Williams. History of France from the Paleolithic period to the accession of Louis XVI with particular attention to the early modern period.

HST 231. Russia and the Soviet Union: 1865 to the Present (3h). MWF 12:00-12:50. B-117. Rupp. Survey of patterns of socioeconomic change from the late imperial period to the present, the emergence of the Revolutionary movement, and the development of Soviet rule from its establishment to its collapse. Students taking HST 231 cannot receive credit for HST 232/REE200.

HST 243. The Middle East since 1500 (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-208. Wilkins. Survey of modern Middle Eastern history from the collapse of the last great Muslim unitary states to the present day. Topics include the rise and demise of the Ottoman and Safvid empires, socio-political reform, the impact of colonialism, Islamic reform, the development of nationalism, and contemporary social and economic challenges. (CD)

HST 245. Modern China since 1850. (3h) MWF 1:00-1:50. A-103. Zhang. Study of modern China from 1850 to the present, focusing on the major political, economic, and cultural transformations occurring in China during this period within the context of modernization, imperialism, and (semi) colonialism, world wars and civil wars, revolution and reform, and the ongoing processes of globalization. (CD)

HST 247. Japan since 1800. (3h) MWF 11:00-11:50. A-103. Hellyer. Survey of Japan in the modern world. Topics include political and cultural revolution, state and empire-building, economic “miracles,” social transformations, military conflicts, and intellectual dilemmas. (CD)

HST 255. U.S. West from 1848 to the Present. (3h) TR 2:00-3:15. B-117. Blee. The second half of a two-semester survey course of the U.S. West, from 1848 to the present. Topics include industrial expansion and urbanization, conflicts with Native Americans, national and ethnic identity formations, contests over natural resources, representations and myths of the West, and religious, cultural, and social diversity.

HST 259. Revolutionary and Nation Making in America, 1750-1815. (3h) MWF 11:00-11:50. B-117. Ruddiman. Explores the social, economic, cultural and political transformation of the diversity of peoples who occupied the continent during its revolutionary and national formative years. Commercial integration, the Seven Years War, the American Revolution, and the Early Republic are placed within their broader international context.

HST 269. African History since 1850. (3h) MWF 12:00-12:50. A-102. Plageman. An overview of African history from the abolition of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade to the post-colonial era of independent African nations with emphasis on African perspectives, initiatives, and agency. (CD)

HST 275. Modern Latin America. (3h) TR 2:00-3:15. A-102. Yarfitz. This course surveys the social, political and economic history of postcolonial Latin America, a region that includes Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Our focus will be the formation of independent nation states and political regimes, and the quest for sovereignty and its challenges in the shadow of the United States. We begin with the struggles for independence from colonial rule and the emergence of Latin American nation‑states in the nineteenth century and continue through the present, including the NAFTA free trade regime, the rise of new social movements such as the Zapatistas and the emergence of new populist figures such as Hugo Chávez. We will consider the challenges facing Latin American political regimes in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the meaning of national autonomy under the influence of the US, the causes and consequences of state terror, and the experience of revolution from the perspective of everyday life. We will learn to differentiate key structural and stylistic features of Latin American political formations such as order and progress dictatorships, populism, military regimes, and revolutionary movements. A key focus will be U.S. policy towards Latin America, from the Monroe Doctrine through the wars in Central America and neoliberalism, as well as popular resistance. (CD)

 

300 Level Courses

HST 305. Medieval and Early Modern Iberia. (3h) TR 12:30-1:45. A-103. O’Connell. The cultures that flourished on the Iberian peninsula between the years 700 and 1700 were extremely diverse and contained often contradictory tendencies.  Hailed by many as a haven of toleration and an example of co-existence between Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the medieval period, early modern Spain and Portugal were bastions of Catholic orthodoxy and the Inquisition.  Iberians were at the forefront of global exploration and discovery, but Spain’s empire by the seventeenth century had fallen behind its English and Dutch competitors.  This course is dedicated to examining these seeming paradoxes, looking at the formation of religious, cultural and political identities and the economics of empire in the medieval and early modern period. (CD)

HST 311. Special Topics in History: Transgender History and Identity. (3h) MW 12:30-1:45. A-104. Mazaris  This course explores the experiences of and responses to transgender, gender non-conforming, and intersex (TGI) people in nineteenth and twentieth century America. We will examine how scientific/medical authorities, legal authorities, and everyday people have understood and responded to various kinds of gender non-conformity. (CD) Cross listed as WGS 377A/677AG

HST 316. Rome: Republic & Empire. (3h) WF 2:00-3:15. A-208. Lerner. Survey of Roman history and civilization from its beginning to about 500 CE, with emphasis on the conquest of the Mediterranean world, the evolution of the Republican state, the growth of autocracy, the administration of the empire, and the interaction between Romans and non-Romans.

HST 319. Poland and the Baltic Region. (3h) TR 9:30-10:45. A-104. Duke. Introduction to the history of Poland and the eastern Baltic littoral since 1760, covering the territory that later became Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland; emergence of independence after World War I; the Soviet experience; and re-establishment of independence during the break-up of the Soviet Union.

HST 333. European Diplomacy, 1848-1914. (3h) MWF 2:00-2:50. A-102. Bobroff The diplomacy of the great powers, with some attention given to the role of publicity in international affairs. Topics include the unification of Italy and of Germany, the Bismarckian system, and the coming of World War I.

HST 357. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (3h) MWF 9:00-9:50. A-104. Escott. The political and military events of the war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed.

HST 369. Modern Military History. (3h) MWF 10:00-10:50. B-117. Hughes. After the Vietnam War, where the US won all the battles but lost the war, the Department of Defense and others began asking how that could have happened.  This course is designed to help Americans answer that question by putting military experience in a broader political, economic, cultural, and social context.  We will talk about military technology, tactics, and strategy and about battles and wars, but we will always place them within the larger historical context.  We can’t understand how the narrowly military elements developed and how and why they were successfully—or unsuccessfully—deployed unless we recognize the complex range of factors that influence both military choices and ultimate outcomes. Credit not allowed for both HST 369 and MIL 229.

HST 382. Religion in the Development of American Higher Education. (3h) TR 3:30-4:45. B-117. Frank. This course examines the role of religious groups in the founding of American colleges and universities, and explores how their role has changed across history up through contemporary trends and issues. Seven major themes provide the framework of the course: the heritage of religion in European higher education; institutions of higher education founded by specific American religious groups including Congregational, Methodist, Baptist, Roman Catholic, and Jewish traditions; religion in the liberal arts curriculum; religious activities in student life; the relationship of colleges and universities with religious sponsors and constituents with a special focus on controversies such as science and religion; the impact of universities on liberal arts colleges; and the trends toward growth and “secularization” in the last fifty years. Cross-listed as HMN 282.

HST 384. Global Outlaws in History since 1500. (3h) TR 3:30-4:45. A-103. Coates. Examines the motivations, ideologies, goals, and behavior of those who have been deemed “outlaws” to international society since 1500, including pirates, terrorists, smugglers, war criminals, and violators of copyright.  Also analyzes the role of power in creating the global regimes that define and target such activities.

HST 385. History through Film: Bollywood and the Making of Modern India. (3h) TR 2:00-3:15. A-104. Rahman. Juxtaposes historical films made by the world’s largest film industry based out of Bombay/Mumbai with textual primary sources and secondary historical works and seeks to understand films as both interpretations and sources of history. Explores specific themes such as nation, gender, caste, and community that are critical to understanding modern Indian and South Asian history and culture. (CD)

HST 390A. Research Seminar: WWII, War Crimes and US & International Law. (3h) W 3:30-6:00. A-104. Hellyer.  After World War II, the United States and its allies tried and punished German and Japanese for war crimes, thereby establishing new precedents for international and American law.  This seminar will explore the war crimes trials of prominent German and Japanese leaders—in Nuremberg and Tokyo—as well as those held for lower ranking political and military officials.  It will then examine several specific legal cases which involved Japanese defendants seeking redress in US courts and the US laws passed in response to the use of military tribunals to prosecute some war criminals.  The course will conclude with an examination of how in the prosecution of accused terrorism suspects since 2001, the US government has revised and/or reaffirmed the laws and precedents established after WW II.  Students will be invited to research in detail a topic related to the course theme and prepare an extended essay.  Students interested in law school or a legal career may find the course particularly valuable.

HST 390B. Research Seminar: Italy and the Mediterranean in the Renaissance. (3h) W 3:30-6:00. B-117. O’Connell. This research seminar is devoted to two intersecting themes: the cultural, political, and economic developments of the Renaissance (c. 1350-1600), and the intense cross-cultural engagement that characterized the Mediterranean world in the same period. Our readings and discussions will focus on the ways Renaissance culture developed across the Mediterranean, asking how and why the particularities of the region affected societal development. The course’s geographical focus will be Italian, although students’ research projects can look to Iberian or Islamic worlds as well.

HST 390C. Research Seminar: The Colonial Encounter in Africa. (3h) W 3:30-6:00. A-102. Plageman. This History Department research seminar offers an opportunity to think about Africa’s colonial period as a dynamic period of negotiation and exchange.  It uses the framework of the “encounter” in order to examine colonialism not as a period of European domination or African resistance, but as a meeting ground for various groups of people, a forum for contrasting ideas, and a process which produced both expected and unexpected outcomes.  In the process, it encourages us to look at the colonial period from various angles, around numerous topics, and beyond a simple European-African divide.  During the first third of the semester, we will look at various facets of the colonial encounter by reading and thoughtfully discussing scholarly works and primary documents.  From there, students will proceed to research and write an article-length piece of original historical scholarship on a topic and context of their choice.  Because historical research is a multi-faceted process, students will produce this paper in stages, will submit and review paper drafts, and will briefly present their writings to the rest of the seminar.

HST 390D. Research Seminar: The War of American Independence. (3h) T 3:30-6:00. A-208. Ruddiman.

HST 391. Honors Seminar. (3h) W 3:30-6:00. B-116. Gillespie. Required for majors in History who are seeking departmental honors, this particular seminar will examine various theories and philosophies of history, as well as their application, to show that historiography is itself historical, valuable only in so much as it reflects and informs the practice of writing history.

 

Fall 2013

100 Level Courses

HST 101A and 101C. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). TR 8:00-9:15 and 9:30-10:45. A-102. Williams. At light speed (in one class period) we will traverse the prehistory of our species and then set about a more intensive review of the next 5200 years (3500 B.C.E to 1700 C.E). Our journey will carry us from Sumeria and the appearance of that form of culture historians call civilization to the eve of industrialization and political revolution in Western Europe.  While examining the the communal structures, achievements, tribulations, and transformations of peoples who, for the most part, spoke Indo-European languages and who, from their origins somewhere north of the Caucasus, came to control not only Europe, but the Americas and the whole of northern Asia, we will try to determine what sense it makes to speak of the tangible and intangible worlds they made as a single civilization and on what bases we might distinguish this civilization from others that appeared elsewhere. (D, CD)

HST 102A and 102D. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 and 12:30-1:45. B-117. Hughes. Europe was backward and poor, compared to China, India, and the Middle East, as late as the 17th and even 18th centuries.  But in the late 19th century it dominated and strongly influenced the world.  Brutal wars, 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, dramatically eroded its influence, as did economic development elsewhere in the world.  Yet it still remains rich and powerful.  Moreover, the Untied States derived its major institutions and values from its European origins.  This course will examine the ways in which Europe, in no small part through its interactions with the rest of the world, developed and exported, and other parts of the world in turn appropriated and adapted, the key ideologies and institutions that characterize the world in which we live.  We will talk about intellectual movements, economic development and competition, and political institutions and cultures; about bureaucracies, markets, corporations, trade unions, political parties, and social movements.  We’ll start in the 17th century and end with the collapse of communism and beginnings of our current, post-Cold War, world. (D, CD)

HST 102B and 102C. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50 and 11:00-11:50. A-102. Rupp. This course provides a survey of European history in the modern era.  Broad themes addressed in the course include the following: differing forms of government and the principles upon which they have been based; the role of ideas in influencing historical change; the impact of social structures and struggles on forms of political power; and the rights and powers of the individual and how these have been defined relative to the community and the state. (D, CD)

HST 102 E. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. B-117. Thomas. This course examines Europe’s tumultuous relationship with the world over the past three centuries.  It begins with a time of increasing European ascendancy during which recently empowered bureaucratized and militarized European states projected their influence to the far reaches of the globe.  In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, political, economic, and intellectual revolutions emanating largely from within Europe enhanced this ascendancy, facilitating economic and political mastery over other regions.  Indeed, by the late nineteenth century many of the world’s inhabitants must have shared the view of one African that his continent faced “a plague of Europeans.”  In the twentieth century, however, world wars and disastrous political and economic developments undercut Europe’s advantages while other areas of the globe adjusted, innovated, caught up, and surpassed their erstwhile rivals.  This course will illuminate how civilizations interact with one another, at times with mutual benefit, at times with mutual disadvantage.  It should also shed light on how people react to outsiders who are either less powerful, more powerful, or simply different. (D, CD)

HST 102F. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3). MWF 2:00-2:50. A-305. Bobroff. This course introduces students to the modern history of Europe and its interactions with the world around it.  Major developments in society, economy, technology, politics, war, and diplomacy will be analyzed.  A central theme of this exploration will be the relationship of state and society through these centuries.  Students will also be introduced to history as a subject of study. (D, CD)

HST 105A. Africa in World History (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-102. Plageman. While popular imagination suggests that the African continent has been isolated from history and historical events, this course examines Africa and Africans as central to the development of the wider world.  Throughout the duration of the semester, we will analyze how African peoples have influenced and were influenced by global events of the last 500 years, particularly in the regions of the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, and expanding Atlantic World.  Major themes include the dynamic character of early societies in various regions of the continent; expanding networks of economic exchange; slavery, the Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Saharan, and Indian Ocean slave trades, and the creation of the African Diaspora; changing European-African interactions; and the recent developments that both link and separate the experiences of African peoples with those of African descent. (D, CD)

HST 108A. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50. A-102. Ruddiman. The nickname of a nation-state, the label for two continents, an idea, and a space where human history careened in a new direction –the history of the Americas, from the last ice age to the present, is one of the movement of people and the creation of new communities, cultures, and identities. This course examines roughly a thousand years of historical change: the rise of American civilizations, the Columbian exchange, colonization and the first globalization, slavery and abolition, revolutions, the rise of new empires, and the contested ideas of citizenship and liberty. (D, CD)

HST 108B and 108E. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50 and 10:00-10:50. B-117. Roberts. This course explores large-scale social, political, and economic trends that connected North and South America to the rest of the globe as well as the lives of individuals who experienced those changes. The course uses readings such as scholarly texts, historical documents, autobiographies, and other first-person accounts to examine how people understood and interpreted imperial expansions, slavery, revolutions, political power, work, human difference, environments, and the movements of ideas and materials. Ultimately, this course investigates the tensions between broad changes over time and individuals’ stories about those changes. Such an approach illuminates the diverse ways in which people viewed their world, their singular and collective power to change it, and the larger structures of power that limited or supported their actions. (D, CD)

HST 108C. The Americas and the World (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-305. Coates. This course explores the history of the Western hemisphere in global perspective since 1500. This includes the story of U.S. domination and Latin American resistance, especially in the 19th and 20th centuries. But we will focus even more on how global forces have shaped the development of North, South, and Central America and the Caribbean. How have political, economic, and cultural developments enhanced or inhibited the ability of individuals and groups to shape their own lives? Topics covered include the “first globalization” of goods, germs, and peoples; slavery, resistance, and emancipation; colonialism and independence; the industrial, market, and transportation revolutions; international migration; war (Cold, Civil and otherwise); the global 1960s; and the histories of development and neoliberalism. We will also think about how the very terms that people use to describe the region (e.g., the “New World,” the “Americas,” “Latin” or “Hispanic” America, etc.) reflect and make possible particular national goals and political projects. (D, CD)

HST 108D, 108G and 108H. The Americas and the World (3h). WF 9:30-10:45,11:00-12:15 in A-208, and 2:00-3.15 in A-102. Blee. Thematically this course focuses on both the macrohistories of economies and societies, and the microhistories of materials and individuals.  Course readings – a combination of scholarly texts, historical documents, autobiographies, and shorter first-person accounts – follow the social, cultural, economic, and political evolutions in North America, South America, and the Caribbean.   Overall, the course content explores the tensions between broad historical trends and individuals’ stories; such an approach leads us to understand the diverse ways in which people viewed their world, their singular and collective power to change it, and the larger structures of power that limited or supported their actions. (D, CD)

HST 108F. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50. B-117. Yarfitz. This course surveys the history of North, South, and Central America with an emphasis on the cross-border circulation of people and
products. The colonial empires of Britain and Spain will be compared from the conquest of indigenous populations and the development of slavery and other colonial institutions through struggles for emancipation. We will focus on the effects of key products on the hemisphere’s political, economic and labor systems as the influence of the United States spread throughout the region: sugar, tobacco, coffee, bananas, oil and cocaine. Political cartoons, film, and other visual sources, along with diaries and declassified documents, will bring our analysis of culture into war, revolution, and daily life. Changing concepts of gender and race reappear throughout. (D, CD)

HST 109A and 109B. Asia and the World (3h). TR 2:00-3:15 and 3:30-4:45. B117. Rahman. Primarily focusing on South, Southeast, and East Asia, the aim of this course is to appreciate the diversity within Asia and understand the history of this continent as linked with global history. Although we cover different time periods, our focus largely remains confined to the last five centuries. What are the different societies and traditions within Asia? What have been their contributions? What historical incidents and trajectories have linked Asia to the rest of the world? Such questions are considered to explore the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Asia and its interactions with the outside world. Specific topics include different religious and cultural traditions, imperialism, global trade and commerce, the Indian Ocean, cross-cultural interactions, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization movements. (D, CD)

HST 109C. Asia and the World (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-305. Hellyer. The course explores how East Asia, chiefly China, Japan and Korea, have interacted with the outside world from 1500 to the present. It considers East Asian views of Europe and the US, the nature of early modern commercial and diplomatic relations, the adoption of new technologies and Christianity in East Asia, East Asian “modernization” in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, WWII in East Asia, communism and socialism, and rapid economic development in the region since WWII. (D, CD)

HST 110A and 110B. The Atlantic World since 1500 (3h).  MWF 9:00-9:50 and 10:00-10:50. A-103. Gillespie.    This course addresses the key themes addressing the interaction of civilizations on four continents surrounding the Atlantic Ocean from 1500 to the present, including the deadly mixture of people and pathogens, labor systems, commerce and crops,  nations, empires, and subjects, that contributed to the tortured emergence of this new world, the dismantling of these empires during the age of revolution, the transnational movement for emancipation and liberty,  and the impact of nationalism, decolonization, the Cold War, neoliberalism, and globalization. (D, CD)

200 Level Courses

HST 230. Russia: Origin to 1865 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-103. Rupp. Survey of the political, social and economic history of Russia, from its origins to the period of the Great Reforms under Alexander II.

HST 242. The Middle East before 1500 (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-103. Wilkins. Survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the emergence of the last great Muslim unitary states. The course provides an overview of political history with more in-depth emphasis on the development of Islamic culture and society in the pre-modern era. (CD)

HST 246. Japan before 1800 (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-208. Hellyer. Survey of Japanese history from the earliest times to the coming of Western imperialism, with emphasis on regional ecologies, economic institutions, cultural practice, military organization, political ideology, and foreign relations. (CD)

HST 258. The American Colonies to 1750 (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50. A-103. Ruddiman. Explores the formative years of early continental America from its pre-contact peoples through the era of effective European settlements. Topics include the interaction among Native Americans, Europeans and Africans; borderlands;  commerce; warfare; colonization; and slavery.

HST 268. African History to 1870 (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-102. Plageman. This course is an overview of African history until c.1870.  Because it covers a large geographical entity as well as an expansive temporal period, it is organized around a number of themes.  Focusing largely on sub-Saharan Africa, we will examine Africa’s diverse geography and environments, agricultural and technological innovations, the operation of states and stateless societies, social and gendered formations, the creation and expansion of trading systems, slavery and the slave trades, religious change and revolutions, and European contacts prior to colonial rule.  To facilitate our appreciation of these themes, we will examine case studies from various regions and time-periods.  We will also analyze a number of source materials, including a range of primary sources, to increase our understanding of the diversity and range of pre-colonial African historical experience. (CD)

HST 284. Latin America’s Colonial Past (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. A-102. Yarfitz. This course explores Latin America’s colonial past from pre-conquest indigenous civilizations to the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century. We will compare popular myths of Conquest to the concepts of Contact and the Columbian Exchange. Although indigenous populations were decimated by European violence and disease, robust communities adapted to their new environment, particularly in the Andes and Mesoamerica. Forced labor, both indigenous and African, often resisted domination, as exemplified in the Haitian Revolution. We will examine the variety of slave systems developed in the Caribbean and South America, and the maturation of other colonial institutions, such as the Inquisition and Catholic Church. The birth of new cultural practices and evolving systems of race, caste, gender and sexuality will be traced through primary sources including native language documents, slave narratives, inquisition records, letters, and castas paintings. (CD)

300 Level Courses

HST 307. The Italian Renaissance (3h). TR 12:30-1:45. A-102. O’Connell. This course examines the economic, political, intellectual, and social developments in the Italian world from ca. 1350 to 1615, a period that marked a profound transition between the medieval and modern worlds. Many examinations of the “Renaissance era” end on or around the year 1500, leaving the impact of the discovery of the Americas, the religious reformations, and the beginnings of the Scientific Revolution to the period often labeled as “early modern.” It is the purpose of this course to investigate to what degree these major transformations in western and world culture were rooted in and influenced by the social, cultural, political, and economic developments on the Italian peninsula beginning in the fourteenth century.

HST 311W. Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n Roll in the Ancient Mediterranean World (3h). WF 11:00-12:15 A-305. Pace. In 1977 a song titled “Sex, Drugs, and Rock and Roll” written by Ian Dury hit the airwaves and the song’s title entered the American pop culture lexicon. This triad has come to represent a certain attitude and lifestyle that is, on the one hand, hedonistic while at the same time representing behaviors that have been essential to human life and culture for millennia. In this course, we will examine the textual and archaeological evidence for ancient attitudes and practices related to sex and sexuality, intoxicants and stimulants, and music and dance in the regions around the Mediterranean Sea in the time period stretching from the Neolithic to the Roman Period.  Students enrolled in the course will be expected to think critically about the multiple roles played by sex, drugs, and music in ancient societies. At the end of the course, we will evaluate to what extent the “sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll” triad existed in the ancient Mediterranean world and whether it evoked the same positive and negative  connotations as in modern American culture.

HST 315. Greek History (3h). WF 12:30-1:45. A-208. Lerner. The course surveys the social and intellectual history of the Ancient Greek World from the eighth to fifth centuries B.C.E.  Throughout this period the Greeks developed many ideas and institutions that were new to antiquity.  These achievements will be seen as the result of the varied and rich responses of a gifted people to a more complex and changing historical landscape than had existed in the ancient Near East.  Though largely new, the Greek experience was not entirely unique.  Some of it can be found in the thought and experience of our own civilization: democracy and philosophy, individual character, and the freedom of social choice.

HST 317. The French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire (3h). WF 9:30-10:45. A-305. Williams. Revolution and wars that constitute one of the pivotal points in modern history.

HST 318. Weimar Germany (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50. A-104. Hughes. This course is an exploration of the arts in Central Europe, 1905-1937, in historical context.  We will read novels, stories, and poems; view some of the best of the early films; listen to challenging and stimulating music; and look at vibrant and provocative paintings, etchings, woodprints, and sculptures.  All along we will be seeking to understand how these works of art, which speak to us still, are nonetheless rooted in a particular time and place, in the economic, social, and political institutions and developments of their day. Also listed as GES 331.

HST 331. The United States in the Age of Empire, 1877-1919 (3h). TR 12:30-1:45 A-104. Coates.  In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries the United States joined in the global scramble for empire. This course examines the domestic and international causes of American imperial expansion; the modes of rule that the U.S. exercised in its formal and informal possessions; and the political and intellectual debates at home and abroad about America’s expansion as a world power.

HST 335. Hindus and Muslims in India, Pakistan, and Beyond (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. B-117. Rahman.  Examines the shared yet different, intertwined yet separate histories of the Hindus and Muslims of modern India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka primarily over the last two centuries. Explores the checkered existence of the two communities in order to understand diversity and questions of coexistence and conflict. (CD)

HST 358. Race and the Courts (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-104. Hopkins. This course examines the impact of state and federal court cases upon the evolution of race relations in the United States. Beginning with Dred Scott, the historical context of each case is placed in juxtaposition to the social and political realities for the given time periods. The subjects addressed are voting rights, school desegregation, employment issues, race and sports, and race and the military. Case law, scholarly articles, as well as the Supreme Court Digest provide a foundation for analyzing government intervention, inaction, and creative interpretation. (CD)

HST 363. The American South to Reconstruction (3h). MW 12:30-1:45. A-104. Gillespie. Examination of the origins of southern distinctiveness, from the first interactions of Europeans, Native Americans and Africans to the Civil War and Emancipation. (CD)

HST 368. The Sectional Crisis: 1820-1860 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-208. Escott. This course examines the deepening crisis that led to Civil War in the U.S., with special attention to politics, culture, reform, economics, and questions of causation, responsibility, or inevitability.

HST 387. Islamic Empires Compared: The Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-103. Wilkins. Examines in a comparative way central themes in the history of the three great Islamic empires of the early modern period (1400-1800).  Considers the problem of political legitimacy faced by Muslim rulers, transformations in Islamic religious practices, and the relationship between war and other aspects of Islamic society and culture.

HST 390A. Research Seminar: The Road to Civil War (3h). R 2:00-4:30. A104. Escott. This seminar will provide opportunities to research the deepening sectional conflict that led to civil war in 19th century America.  Resources are abundant for studying the political, social, and cultural causes of conflict.

HST 390B. Research Seminar: Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World (3h). W 2:30-5:00. A-208. Lerner. This research seminar follows the career of Alexander III, whose conquests fused the destinies of the Greek World and those of Asia and Africa.  Even after the kingdoms of his successors yielded to the conquests of the Romans and Parthians, the composite Hellenistic Civilization, or imitations of it, prevailed for several generations in the lands between the Ganges River and Cornwall, and between Gilbraltar and the Aral Sea.  The seminar examines Alexander’s conquests until his death in 323 BCE

HST 390C. Research Seminar: Slavery and Abolition (3h). T 3:30-6:00. A-104. Parent.

HST 391A. Honors Seminar (3h). W 3:00-5:30. B-116. O’Connell. This course is designed to examine a variety of historical approaches to the past. We will look at how historians have imagined their object of study, how they have used primary sources as evidence for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussions in their work, and the advantages and drawbacks of these different approaches. The first third of the course will focus on the development of historical thought and practice in early modern and modern Europe and the second third will examine contemporary methods such as microhistory, macrohistory, social history, gender history, and environmental history.  The final third will examine the emerging methods of visual representation and digital history as well as the role of popular history in the historical profession.

 Summer 2013

Summer Session I: May 29 –  July 3

HST 102.  Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). 9:25-10:40. A-104. Caron. Europe was backward and poor, compared to China, India, and the Middle East, as late as the 17th and even 18th centuries.  But in the late 19th century it dominated and strongly influenced the world.  Brutal wars, 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, dramatically eroded its influence, as did economic development elsewhere in the world.  Yet it still remains rich and powerful.  Moreover, the United States derived its major institutions and values from its European origins.  This course will examine the ways in which Europe, in no small part through its interactions with the rest of the world, developed and exported, and other parts of the world in turn appropriated and adapted, the key ideologies and institutions that characterize the world in which we live.  We will talk about intellectual movements, economic development and competition, and political institutions and cultures; about bureaucracies, markets, corporations, trade unions, political parties, and social movements.  We will start in the seventeenth century and end with the collapse of communism and beginnings of our current, post-Cold War, world. (D, CD)

HST 252. US History since 1865 (3h). 10:50-12:05. A-104. Caron. This course will examine the post-reconstructed nation with special attention to the politics of equilibrium; the economic impact of industrialization and agricultural revolutions; the positive and negative aspects of rapid urbanization; immigration and the class, ethnic, and religious clashes that ensued; Jim Crow and civil rights; the growth of Big Business and labor’s response; Populism; the acquisition of an empire; Progressive reforms at city, state and federal levels; World War I at home and abroad; and the changing notions of femininity and masculinity.We will then examine the institution of the New Deal as FDR’s response to the Depression; wars at home and abroad, including World War II, the Cold War, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq I & II, and Afghanistan; the rise and fall of unionism; various movements from civil rights, women’s rights, welfare rights, Native American rights, to student rights; countercultures from the 1950s through the 1980s; government regulation of the environment; science and technology; the growth of the Imperial Presidency; Watergate and beyond; and liberalism and conservatism.

Summer Session II: July 8 – August 10

HST 102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). 9:25-10:40. A-102. Rupp. This course provides a survey of European history in the modern era.  Broad themes addressed in the course include the following: differing forms of government and the principles upon which they have been based; the role of ideas in influencing historical change; the impact of social structures and struggles on forms of political power; and the rights and powers of the individual and how these have been defined relative to the community and the state. (D, CD)

Spring 2013

100 Level Courses

HST 101A and 101B. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 and 11:00-12:15. A-208. Dunwoody. This course examines the rise and path of Western civilization from the dawn of urban society in Mesopotamia and Egypt until around 1700. Starting with an examination of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, we shall explore how the rise of Christianity, the barbarian invasions, the fall of Rome, and the rise of Islam all contributed to the new beginnings of European societies on the northern shores of the Mediterranean. We shall consider the Greek and Roman ways of life: their religions, social traditions, economies, political systems, and imperial adventures. And we shall see how Europeans adopted and adapted these ways of life to the new realities of their Middle Ages and the early modern period. Using a variety of primary sources, we will consider major topics in Western civilization including: competing models of political authority and the tensions between them; the contentious relationship between secular power and religious power in the West; religious violence and religious toleration in the Crusades and in Europe; the effects of urban revival and commercial development on notions of justice, on gender roles, and on everyday life; the gradual rediscovery of Europe’s Roman heritage before, during, and after the Renaissance; and Europe’s place in the wider world and the beginnings of global modernity. (CD)

HST 102A.  Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. B-117. Hughes.  Europe was backward and poor, compared to China, India, and the Middle East, as late as the 17th and even 18th centuries.  But in the late 19th century it dominated and strongly influenced the world.  Brutal wars, 1914-1918 and 1939-1945, dramatically eroded its influence, as did economic development elsewhere in the world.  Yet it still remains rich and powerful.  Moreover, the Untied States derived its major institutions and values from its European origins.  This course will examine the ways in which Europe, in no small part through its interactions with the rest of the world, developed and exported, and other parts of the world in turn appropriated and adapted, the key ideologies and institutions that characterize the world in which we live.  We will talk about intellectual movements, economic development and competition, and political institutions and cultures; about bureaucracies, markets, corporations, trade unions, political parties, and social movements.  We’ll start in the 17th century and end with the collapse of communism and beginnings of our current, post-Cold War, world. (CD)

HST 102B. Europe and the World in the Modern Era (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50. A-102. Rupp.  This course provides a survey of European history in the modern era.  Broad themes addressed in the course include the following: differing forms of government and the principles upon which they have been based; the role of ideas in influencing historical change; the impact of social structures and struggles on forms of political power; and the rights and powers of the individual and how these have been defined relative to the community and the state. (CD)

HST 102C and 102E.  Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50 and 12:00-12:50. B-117. Bobroff.  This course introduces students to the modern history of Europe and its interactions with the world around it.  Major developments in society, economy, technology, politics, war, and diplomacy will be analyzed.  A central theme of this exploration will be the relationship of state and society through these centuries.  Students will also be introduced to history as a subject of study. (CD)

HST 102D. Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-102. Sinanoglou. This course offers an introduction to the history of Europe from the Old Regime to the early twenty-first century. We explore social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual history, engaging with themes such as the structures and functions of government and society, the role of international relations in shaping domestic, regional and global politics, the relationship of people to modes of production and consumption, the influence of ideas on political, economic and social life, and the position of individuals in relation to communities and states. Using both a textbook, which looks back from a distance and pulls together a coherent narrative, and primary sources, which are produced in particular historical moments, we track, analyze and debate that central concern of historical scholarship: change over time. (CD)

HST 102F. Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. A-102. Thomas. This course examines Europe’s tumultuous relationship with the world over the past three centuries.  It begins with a time of increasing European ascendancy during which recently empowered bureaucratized and militarized European states projected their influence to the far reaches of the globe.  In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, political, economic, and intellectual revolutions emanating largely from within Europe enhanced this ascendancy, facilitating economic and political master over other regions.  Indeed, by the late nineteenth century many of the world’s inhabitants must have shared the view of one African that his continent faced “a plague of Europeans.”  In the twentieth century, however, world wars and disastrous political and economic developments undercut Europe’s advantages while other areas of the globe adjusted, innovated, caught up, and surpassed their erstwhile rivals.  This course will illuminate how civilizations interact with one another, at times with mutual benefit, at times with mutual disadvantage.  It should also shed light on how people react to outsiders who are either more powerful, less powerful, or simply different than them. (CD)

HST 102G, 102H, and 102I. Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50, 11:00-11:50, and 1:00-1:50. A-208, A-208, B-117. Marritt. This course surveys critical social, economic, and political developments and thought within modern Europe as well as its influence on and interaction with other parts of the world over three centuries. Our sources will illuminate events and ideas that shaped a modern landscape, including the Enlightenment, changes in political governance and social structure, urbanization, industrialization, competing political ideologies, nationalism, and the world wars. We will explore Europe’s changing position in the world over time, from colonialism in the eighteenth century and imperialism in the nineteenth century to decolonization and the increasing global interdependence that marked the twentieth century. Through it all, we will maintain a focus on the roles and rights of individuals, not only in relation to the state, but also in such personal relationships and experiences as employer and employee, master and slave, and husband and wife. Students will contextualize and analyze primary and secondary sources, use evidence from those sources to interpret the past, and develop and present original arguments for classroom discussions and written assignments. (CD)

HST 105A and 105B. Africa in World History (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50 and 12:00-12:50. A-102. Plageman.  While popular imagination suggests that the African continent has been isolated from history and historical events, this course examines Africa and Africans as central to the development of the wider world.  Throughout the duration of the semester, we will analyze how African peoples have influenced and were influenced by global events of the last 500 years, particularly in the regions of the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, and expanding Atlantic World.  Major themes include the dynamic character of early societies in various regions of the continent; expanding networks of economic exchange; slavery, the Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Saharan, and Indian Ocean slave trades, and the creation of the African Diaspora; changing European-African interactions; and the recent developments that both link and separate the experiences of African peoples with those of African descent. (CD

HST 105C. Africa in World History (3h). MW 12:30-1:45. A-208. Parent. This course examines the continent of Africa from prehistory to the present in global perspective, as experienced and understood by Africans themselves. Their traditions, religions, migrations, economies, and civilizations have all developed in relationship to other regions and peoples of the world. The pressures of the Mediterranean, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean economies, the slave trades, and colonial domination have elicited responses of accommodation, resistance, revolt and independence. (CD)

HST 108A and 108C. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50 and 10:00-10:50. A-103. Roberts. This course explores large-scale social, political, and economic trends that connected North and South America to the rest of the globe as well as the lives of individuals who experienced those changes. The course uses readings such as scholarly texts, historical documents, autobiographies, and other first-person accounts to examine how people understood and interpreted imperial expansions, slavery, revolutions, political power, work, human difference, environments, and the movements of ideas and materials. Ultimately, this course investigates the tensions between broad changes over time and individuals’ stories about those changes. Such an approach illuminates the diverse ways in which people viewed their world, their singular and collective power to change it, and the larger structures of power that limited or supported their actions. (CD)

HST 108B. The Americas and the World (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-102. Coates. This course explores the history of the Western hemisphere in global perspective since 1500. This includes the story of U.S. domination and Latin American resistance, especially in the 19th and 20th centuries. But we will focus even more on how global forces have shaped the development of North, South, and Central America and the Caribbean. How have political, economic, and cultural developments enhanced or inhibited the ability of individuals and groups to shape their own lives? Topics covered include the “first globalization” of goods, germs, and peoples; slavery, resistance, and emancipation; colonialism and independence; the industrial, market, and transportation revolutions; international migration; war (Cold, Civil and otherwise); the global 1960s; and the histories of development and neoliberalism. We will also think about how the very terms that people use to describe the region (e.g., the “New World,” the “Americas,” “Latin” or “Hispanic” America, etc.) reflect and make possible particular national goals and political projects. (CD)

HST 109A. Asia and the World (3h). TR 3:30-4:45. B-117. Rahman. Primarily focusing on South, Southeast, and East Asia, the aim of this course is to appreciate the diversity within Asia and understand the history of this continent as linked with global history. Although we cover different time periods, our focus largely remains confined to the last five centuries. What are the different societies and traditions within Asia? What have been their contributions? What historical incidents and trajectories have linked Asia to the rest of the world? Such questions are considered to explore the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Asia and its interactions with the outside world. Specific topics include different religious and cultural traditions, imperialism, global trade and commerce, the Indian Ocean, cross-cultural interactions, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization movements. (CD)

HST 110. The Atlantic World since 1500 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-103. Welland. This course examines the major developments that have linked the civilizations bordering the Atlantic Ocean from 1500 to the present. Themes include exploration; commerce; European colonization and indigenous responses; disease; religious conversion and revivalism; mestizo and creole culture; imperial warfare; enlightenment; revolution; slavery and abolition; extractive economies; nationalism; ‘scientific racism’; invented traditions; the black diaspora and negritude; decolonization; the Cold War; segregation and apartheid; dictatorship; neoliberalism; and globalization. (CD)

200 Level Courses

HST 232. Introduction to Russian and East European Studies (3h). MW 3:30-4:45. A-208. Duke.  This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Russia and the Soviet Union, including an examination of society, polity, economy, and culture over time.

HST 240. African-American HIstory (3h). MW 2:00-3:15. A-208. Parent. This course examines the role of African Americans in the development of the U.S., with attention to African heritage, forced migration, Americanization, and influence.

HST 257. The US and the World 1914-2003 (3h). TR 12:30-1:45. A-102. Coates. The second half of a two-semester survey of U.S. foreign relations.  Major topics explore the economic, political, cultural and social currents linking the U.S. to Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia between 1914 and 2003. Particular attention is given to the influence of the international system — ranging from hot and cold wars, to decolonization, economic interdependence and transnational businesses and institutions — on U.S. diplomacy, commerce, and domestic politics and culture.

HST 261. Modern South Asia (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. B-117. Rahman. This course provides an overview of history, culture, and politics of modern South Asia beginning with the political ascendancy of the British in India in 1750s till date. The British started gaining political foothold since the mid-eighteenth century. It is a landmark in the history of the Indian subcontinent since a gradual defeat of the Mughal Empire gave way to the British starting a journey of conquest and expansion and the eventual formation of the British Empire. This course maps out a general history of various events and incidents of historical importance in a chronological as well as thematic manner. Topics include South Asian society and culture, British conquest and economic subordination, Indian responses to British intervention, socio-religious reform movements among Hindus and Muslims, role of women in the making of modern South Asia, the revolt of 1857, Indian independence struggle, Gandhi, Muslim League and the demand for Pakistan, partition of British India, role of Jawaharlal Nehru in the formation of independent India, post-independence Pakistan, and occasional and brief introductions to the South Asian states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, and Sri Lanka.

300 Level Courses

HST 308. The World of Alexander the Great (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-208. Lerner. This course examines Alexander the Great’s conquests and the fusion of Greek culture with those of the Near East, Central Asia, and India. Emphasis is on the creation of new political institutions and social customs, modes of addressing philosophical and religious issues, and the achievements and limitations of Hellenistic civilization.

HST 309. European International Relations since World War I (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-102. Sinanoglou. Surveys European international relations in the twentieth century beyond treaties and alliances to the economic, social, and demographic factors that shaped formal arrangements between states. Covers the impact of new forms of international cooperation, pooled sovereignty, and non-governmental organizations on European diplomacy and international relations.

HST 310. 20th-Century Eastern Europe (3h). MWF 12:00-12:50. A-103. Rupp. Examination of the history of 20th-century Eastern Europe, including the creation of nation-states, World War II, and the nature of Communist regimes established in the postwar period. Course includes a discussion of the collapse of the Eastern Bloc and the challenges of European integration.

HST 311E. Special Topics: Origins of World War I (3h). MW 2:00-3:15. B-117. Bobroff. We will study here the causes of the First World War. Going beyond traditional diplomatic history, this course will consider a wide range of intertwined factors that contributed to the mortal crisis, including military, economic, social, and cultural ones. In doing so, we will also consider the debates between and within areas of inquiry. The broader history of the study of the origins of the war will also be considered. Along the way, the main nations involved will be examined, with a consideration of both their internal and external affairs. And the course will conclude with a case study of the road to war of one nation – the United Kingdom.

HST 330. Race, Religions and Sex in Early Modern Europe (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-103. Dunwoody. Explores issues of race, ethnicity, and gender in Europe between 1400 and 1800. Topics include contact and conflict among Jews, Muslims, and Christians; marriage, the family, and sexuality; migration and immigration; and slavery and conquest in early European colonies and empires. (CD)

HST 336. Gender and Power in African History (3h). MW 2:00-3:15. A-103. Plageman.  Examines the close relationship between understandings of gender and power in African societies, with particular focus on the last several hundred years.  After addressing the sources and methods scholars have used to address these topics, the course examines conceptions of gender and power in pre-colonial African societies, the impact of the colonial period on men and women, the gendered nature of nationalism and independence, and the importance of gender and power to many of Africa’s post-colonial challenges. (CD)

HST 351. Global Environmental History (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. A-103. Roberts. Analysis of environmental aspects of world history from the beginning of agriculture to the present.  Focus on how humans have used the environment to different ends. Topics include forests, agriculture, water, urbanism, science, warfare, conservation, energy, and perceptions of nature.

HST 352. Ten Years of Madness: The Chinese Cultural Revolution, 1966 to 1976 (3h). MW 2:00-3:15. A-102. Zhang. A history of the Chinese Cultural Revolution from 1966 to 1976. Examines the origins, consequences, and collective memories of the catastrophic political events and the social and cultural transformations that took place in China during the last decade of Mao’s leadership. (CD)

HST 357. The Civil War and Reconstruction (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50. A-104. Escott. The political and military events of the war and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed.

HST 366. Studies in Historic Preservation (3h). W 3:00-5:30. A-104. Frank. Analysis of history museums and agencies and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history through art/facts, restorations, and reconstructions.

HST 369. Modern Military History (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50. B-117. Hughes. After the Vietnam War, where the US won all the battles but lost the war, the Department of Defense and others began asking how that could have happened.  This course is designed to help Americans answer that question by putting military experience in a broader political, economic, cultural, and social context.  We will talk about military technology, tactics, and strategy and about battles and wars, but we will always place them within the larger historical context.  We can’t understand how the narrowly military elements developed and how and why they were successfully—or unsuccessfully—deployed unless we recognize the complex range of factors that influence both military choices and ultimate outcomes. Credit not allowed for both HST 369 and MIL 229.

HST 388. Nation, Faith, and Gender in the Middle East (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50. A-208. Wilkins. Traces the development of nationalism and its interaction with religious, transnational, and gender identities in the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include Zionism, Arabism, Turkish nationalism, and Islamic revivalism.

HST 390. Research Seminar: Travelers in the Early Modern Middle East (3h). W 2:00-4:30. A-104. Wilkins.  The Early Modern Era (1400-1800) saw an unprecedented rise in the number of world travelers.  Including merchants, pilgrims, bureaucrats, diplomats, spies, scholars, and others, they generated a vast travel literature that articulated many different perspectives, motives, and agendas.  Foreign travel can be seen as assisting cross-cultural understanding, but one could argue that just as often it helped only to confirm the point of view of the traveler.  This seminar explores, in turn, the defining characteristics of the Early Modern Period, the vexed question of Orientalism, and conclude with an exploration of selected European travelers in the Middle East and selected Middle Easterner travelers in Europe. Making use of primary English language sources, students are invited to write substantial research papers on a single traveler or otherwise examine a theme or pattern among multiple accounts.

HST 390. Research Seminar: British Imperialism (3h). T 2:00-4:30. B-116. Welland. From Caribbean piracy in the sixteenth century to the handover of Hong Kong in 1997, British imperialism was a varied collection of policies and ideologies, enacted and experienced by a varied collection of people. Rather than track the empire’s “rise and fall,” this course is organized around entwined themes of labour, race, sexual politics, and the environment. We will read both new and landmark texts in the field and students will complete a major research paper.

HST 390. Research Seminar: European Social and Political History, 1848-1989 (3h). R 3:00-5:30. A-104. Hughes. Students in this course will develop in consultation with the professor a research project in a topic of interest to them in recent European history.  They will do several assignments culminating in the writing of a 25- to 30-page paper on that topic.  Because of the need to use mostly primary sources for the paper, most papers will be on British or Irish history, though numerous students have written (in English) papers on Spanish, French, German, or Italian history have used their foreign-language skills in those countries’ languages.

HST 390. Research Seminar: Emancipation, Its Legacies, and Historical Memory (3h). T 3:00-5:30. A-104. Gillespie. W.E.B. Du Bois famously observed that the post- Emancipation years were not only “an attempt by African Americans to overcome racial oppression, but . . . a profoundly important chapter in the history of America’s working people more generally.” This seminar will begin with readings on the process of emancipation as an end to forced labor, as a bitter conflict between freed slaves and their former masters, and as a critical juncture in shaping U.S. race relations from 1865 to the present. These readings will provide the foundation on which students will follow a supportive process to design, research and write original essays based on the course theme.

HST 391. Honors Seminar (3h). R 3:30-6:00. A-104. Gillespie. Required for majors in History who are seeking departmental honors, this particular seminar will examine various theories and philosophies of history, as well as their application, to show that historiography is itself historical, valuable only in so much as it reflects and informs the practice of writing history.

Fall 2012

100 Level Courses

HST 101A, 101B and 101C. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50, 11:00-11:50, 1:00-1:50. A-103. Dunwoody. This course examines the rise and path of Western civilization from the dawn of urban society in Mesopotamia and Egypt until around 1700. Starting with an examination of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, we shall explore how the rise of Christianity, the barbarian invasions, the fall of Rome, and the rise of Islam all contributed to the new beginnings of European societies on the northern shores of the Mediterranean. We shall consider the Greek and Roman ways of life: their religions, social traditions, economies, political systems, and imperial adventures. And we shall see how Europeans adopted and adapted these ways of life to the new realities of their Middle Ages and the early modern period. Using a variety of primary sources, we will consider major topics in Western civilization including: competing models of political authority and the tensions between them; the contentious relationship between secular power and religious power in the West; religious violence and religious toleration in the Crusades and in Europe; the effects of urban revival and commercial development on notions of justice, on gender roles, and on everyday life; the gradual rediscovery of Europe’s Roman heritage before, during, and after the Renaissance; and Europe’s place in the wider world and the beginnings of global modernity.

HST 102A, 102B, and 102D. Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50, 11:00-11:50, and 1:00-1:50. B-117. Bobroff.  This course introduces students to the modern history of Europe and its interactions with the world around it.  Major developments in society, economy, technology, politics, war, and diplomacy will be analyzed.  A central theme of this exploration will be the relationship of state and society through these centuries.  Students will also be introduced to history as a subject of study.

HST 102C. Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h).  TR 12:30-1:45. A-103. Sinanaglou. This course offers an introduction to the history of Europe from the Old Regime to the early twenty-first century. We explore social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual history, engaging with themes such as the structures and functions of government and society, the role of international relations in shaping domestic, regional and global politics, the relationship of people to modes of production and consumption, the influence of ideas on political, economic and social life, and the position of individuals in relation to communities and states. Using both a textbook, which looks back from a distance and pulls together a coherent narrative, and primary sources, which are produced in particular historical moments, we track, analyze and debate that central concern of historical scholarship: change over time.

HST 102E and 102F.  Europe and the Modern World since 1700 (3h). MWF 12:00-12:50 and 2:00-2:50.  A-305. Thomas. This course examines Europe’s tumultuous relationship with the world over the past three centuries.  It begins with a time of increasing European ascendancy during which recently empowered bureaucratized and militarized European states projected their influence to the far reaches of the globe.  In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, political, economic, and intellectual revolutions emanating largely from within Europe enhanced this ascendancy, facilitating economic and political master over other regions.  Indeed, by the late nineteenth century many of the world’s inhabitants must have shared the view of one African that his continent faced “a plague of Europeans.”  In the twentieth century, however, world wars and disastrous political and economic developments undercut Europe’s advantages while other areas of the globe adjusted, innovated, caught up, and surpassed their erstwhile rivals.  This course will illuminate how civilizations interact with one another, at times with mutual benefit, at times with mutual disadvantage.  It should also shed light on how people react to outsiders who are either more powerful, less powerful, or simply different than them. (CD)

HST 103A. World Civilizations to 1500 (3h).  TR 9:30-10:45 and 12:30-1:45.  A-208.  Zhang.  This course surveys the evolution of world civilizations from around 3500 BCE to 1500 CE.  Within a roughly chronological framework, it seeks to highlight the broad patterns of development among major human communities, especially those on the Eurasian continent and in Africa, with respect to their political and social institutions, economic life, values, intellectual traditions and religious beliefs. (CD)

HST 103B. World Civilizations to 1500 (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. A-208. Lerner. The course surveys the social, political and cultural development of a variety of world civilizations from their inception to 1500.  The focus concerns a detailed analysis of those civilizations, which represent the most spectacular example of social formation: the relationship between the individual and deity as a religious expression; the relationship between society and nature as a philosophical dilemma; and the relationship between the individual and society as a cultural and political manifestation.  In each case, the unifying theme we shall explore is how these peoples organized themselves politically, economically, and socially as a response to their particular geographical and environmental condition.  We shall see that the legacy of these civilizations is one of cultural syncretism manifested in the diversity and complexity of their traditions and ideas. This section open to First Year Students only. (CD)

HST 103C. World Civilizations to 1500 (3h). MWF 2:00-2:50. A-208. Lerner. The course surveys the social, political and cultural development of a variety of world civilizations from their inception to 1500.  The focus concerns a detailed analysis of those civilizations, which represent the most spectacular example of social formation: the relationship between the individual and deity as a religious expression; the relationship between society and nature as a philosophical dilemma; and the relationship between the individual and society as a cultural and political manifestation.  In each case, the unifying theme we shall explore is how these peoples organized themselves politically, economically, and socially as a response to their particular geographical and environmental condition.  We shall see that the legacy of these civilizations is one of cultural syncretism manifested in the diversity and complexity of their traditions and ideas. This section open to First Year Students only. (CD)

HST 105A. Africa in World History (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. A-208. Plageman. While popular imagination suggests that the African continent has been isolated from history and historical events, this course examines Africa and Africans as central to the development of the wider world.  Throughout the duration of the semester, we will analyze how African peoples have influenced and were influenced by global events of the last 500 years, particularly in the regions of the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, and expanding Atlantic World.  Major themes include the dynamic character of early societies in various regions of the continent; expanding networks of economic exchange; slavery, the Trans-Atlantic, Trans-Saharan, and Indian Ocean slave trades, and the creation of the African Diaspora; changing European-African interactions; and the recent developments that both link and separate the experiences of African peoples with those of African descent. (CD)

HST 108A, 108C, and 108D. The Americas and the World (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50, 10:00-10:50, and 12:00-12:50. A-208. Roberts. This course explores large-scale social, political, and economic trends that connected North and South America to the rest of the globe as well as the lives of individuals who experienced those changes. The course uses readings such as scholarly texts, historical documents, autobiographies, and other first-person accounts to examine how people understood and interpreted imperial expansions, slavery, revolutions, political power, work, human difference, environments, and the movements of ideas and materials. Ultimately, this course investigates the tensions between broad changes over time and individuals’ stories about those changes. Such an approach illuminates the diverse ways in which people viewed their world, their singular and collective power to change it, and the larger structures of power that limited or supported their actions.

HST 108B. The Americas and the World (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-305. Coates. This course explores the history of the Western hemisphere in global perspective since 1500. This includes the story of U.S. domination and Latin American resistance, especially in the 19th and 20th centuries. But we will focus even more on how global forces have shaped the development of North, South, and Central America and the Caribbean. How have political, economic, and cultural developments enhanced or inhibited the ability of individuals and groups to shape their own lives? Topics covered include the “first globalization” of goods, germs, and peoples; slavery, resistance, and emancipation; colonialism and independence; the industrial, market, and transportation revolutions; international migration; war (Cold, Civil and otherwise); the global 1960s; and the histories of development and neoliberalism. We will also think about how the very terms that people use to describe the region (e.g., the “New World,” the “Americas,” “Latin” or “Hispanic” America, etc.) reflect and make possible particular national goals and political projects.

HST 109A. Asia and the World (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. B-117. Rahman. Primarily focusing on South, Southeast, and East Asia, the aim of this course is to appreciate the diversity within Asia and understand the history of this continent as linked with global history. Although we cover different time periods, our focus largely remains confined to the last five centuries. What are the different societies and traditions within Asia? What have been their contributions? What historical incidents and trajectories have linked Asia to the rest of the world? Such questions are considered to explore the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Asia and its interactions with the outside world. Specific topics include different religious and cultural traditions, imperialism, global trade and commerce, the Indian Ocean, cross-cultural interactions, modernization, nationalism, and decolonization movements. (CD)

HST 110A & 110B. The Atlantic World since 1500 (3h). TR 9:30-10:45 & 11:00-12:15. A-102. Welland. This course examines the major developments that have linked the civilizations bordering the Atlantic Ocean from 1500 to the present. Themes include exploration; commerce; European colonization and indigenous responses; disease; religious conversion and revivalism; mestizo and creole culture; imperial warfare; enlightenment; revolution; slavery and abolition; extractive economies; nationalism; ‘scientific racism’; invented traditions; the black diaspora and negritude; decolonization; the Cold War; segregation and apartheid; dictatorship; neoliberalism; and globalization.

HST 132A. European Historical Novels (1.5H). T 2:00-3:15. Barefield. The role of the historical past in selected works of fiction.

200 Level Courses

HST 230. Russia: Origins to 1865 (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50. A-102. Rupp. Survey of the political, social and economic history of Russia, from its origins to the period of the Great Reforms under Alexander II.

HST 243. The Middle East since 1500 (3h). TR 11:00-12:15. B-117. Wilkins. Survey of Middle Eastern history from the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires to the late 20th century. Topics include state and empire-building, the impact of European colonialism, the development of nationalism, Islamic reform, and contemporary social and economic challenges.

HST 256. The U.S. and the World, 1763-1914. TR 3:30-4:45. A-103. Coates. This first half of a two-part course analyzes American foreign relations—including diplomacy and war, but also trade, immigration, and the transmission of ideas and culture—from the end of the Seven Years War to the outbreak of World War I. To highlight global contexts, we will examine the U.S. experience through the lens of empire. From the American Revolution through Manifest Destiny, the Monroe Doctrine, and the diplomacy of the Civil War, to the emergence of the U.S. as a “Great Power” in 1898, American policymakers and citizens grappled with foreign empires (Britain, France, Spain) and with the idea of empire itself. Was the United States to be a democratic republic, an Empire of Liberty, a settler empire, or an imperial power? Where should its boundaries lie, and how should the rights of governments and individuals be defined within them? Through extensive use of primary source materials, we will examine how these debates themselves reflected the intersection of national and global forces, particularly war and trade.

HST 260. Premodern South Asia. TR 11:00-12:15. A-305. Rahman. An overview of the people and cultures of ancient and medieval India, this course delves into the rich history and traditions of one of the earliest human civilizations. We seek to learn about religions, scientific developments, literature, arts, empires, dynasties, cross-cultural interactions, and conquests and defeats in India’s premodern history. This class endeavors to understand the background of South Asia’s present by considering topics such as the Indus Valley Civilization, the Vedic Age, Hinduism, Mauryan Empire, Gupta Era, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Delhi Sultanate, Vijayanagar Empire, and the Mughal Empire. We use a variety of sources including Sanskrit stories, religious scriptures, political treatises, autobiographical narratives, royal edicts, monuments, and paintings to explore the diverse cultures and traditions of India.

300 Level Courses

HST 311W. Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the Ancient Mediterranean (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. B-117. Pace. In 1977 a song titled “Sex, Drugs, and Rock and Roll” written by Ian Dury hit the airwaves and the song’s title entered the American pop culture lexicon. This triad has come to represent a certain attitude and lifestyle that is, on the one hand, hedonistic and seemingly lacking virtue while, on the other hand, it represents for many the ultimate in personality liberty. In this course, we will examine the textual and archaeological evidence for ancient attitudes and practices related to sex and sexuality, intoxicants and stimulants, and music in the region around the Mediterranean Sea in the time period stretching from the Neolithic to the Roman Period. Students enrolled in the course will be expected to think critically about the multiple roles played by sex, drugs, and music in ancient societies. At the end of the course, we will evaluate to what extent the “sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll” triad existed in the ancient Mediterranean world and whether it evoked the same positive and negative connotations as in modern American culture.

HST 312. Jews, Greeks, and Romans (3h). WF 11:00-12:15. A-208. Lerner.  Largely from a Jewish context, the course explores the political, religious, social, and philosophical values shaped by the collision between Jews, Greeks, and Romansfrom the Hellenistic Period to the Middle Ages.  The interaction brought about the end of antiquity, the rise of Christianity, and the establishment of a common culture that has largely defined the Western World: Judeo-Christian moral attitudes and Graeco-Roman civilization.  There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge of the period, but students should be prepared to examine religion from a secular, intellectual point of view.

HST 327. Power and Profit in Britain (3h). TR 2:00-3:15. A-102. Welland. The years between Britain’s Glorious Revolution in 1688 and the outbreak of world war in 1914 were marked by the nation’s rise to global economic and imperial dominance. This course examines the economic ideas that buttressed these developments, their institutional expression, and their importance to British culture and civil society. It will also consider political economy’s transition from a branch of moral philosophy to a social science. Topics include connections between consumption and identity; the relationship of morals to markets; the role of gender and the household; knowledge, technology, and the industrial revolution; and the place of free trade in the political imagination.

HST 338. Gender, Race and Class since 1800 (3h). MWF 1:00-1:50. A-102. Caron. This course examines gender roles and relations from the early nineteenth century to the present.  We will analyze how political, economic and cultural changes impact the definitions of femininity and masculinity, the changing notions of sexuality, and the continuity and diversity of gender roles.  We will pay particular attention to race, class and ethnicity.  This class will be discussion-oriented. Students are expected to participate in class discussions based on these readings.

HST 339. Sickness and Health in American Society (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50. A-102. Caron. This course is a broad survey of American sickness and health from the pre-colonial period to the present.  Understanding the evolution of medical care provides a basis for comprehending the context of health care in the twenty-first century.  We will examine the indigenous healing methods of Native Americans; the introduction of European methods; the development of medical technology; the use of anesthesia; the professionalization of medicine; the rise of medical education; changes in childbirth procedures; health care during war time; the social and economic impact of diseases; the economics of health care; the ethics of human experimentation; sexually transmitted diseases; the continuing allure of homeopathic healing; and reproductive health issues.

HST 340. Social and Cultural Change in Urban Africa (3h). T/R 2:00-3:15. A-208. While popular imagination suggests that the African past is largely a rural one, many of the continent’s most explosive social and cultural innovations have taken place in its cities.  This course examines African cities in a historical perspective, with particular emphasis on how ordinary city residents—not just political or economic authorities—shaped and experienced some of sub-Saharan Africa’s most important historical transformations.  Major topics for the course include the social fabric of pre-colonial African cities, the uneven and unpredictable impact of colonialism on African towns, cities as sites of cultural revolutions and political independence, and the contemporary conditions and challenges facing contemporary urban residents.

HST 341. Africans in the Atlantic World, 1750-1815 (3h). T/R 12:00-1:45. A-305. Explores Africans’ experience in the Atlantic world (Africa, Europe, and the Americas) during the era of slave trade by examining their encounters with Indians and Europeans and their adjustment to slave traders in West Africa.

HST 358. Race and the Courts (3h). TR 12:30-1:45. A-102. Hopkins. This course will use the historical method to examine the impact of state and federal court cases upon the evolution of race relations in this country.  Beginning with Dred Scott, the historical context of each case will be placed in juxtaposition to the social and political realities for the given periods. Case law, scholarly articles, as well the Supreme Court Digest will provide a foundation for analyzing government intervention, inaction, and creative interpretation. Topics for consideration will include the impact of Dred Scott, Reconstruction, lynchings, and the emergence of the KKK; the analysis of civil rights during the Great Depression and the New Deal; separate but equal applications in American life; voting rights issues; and school desegregation before and after Brown and Seattle.   The goal of the course is to demonstrate the historical evolution of race relations in the United States which is predicated upon the judicial interpretation of the rights of its citizens.

HST 362. American Constitutional History (3h). TR 3:30-4:15. A-102. Zick. Origins of the Constitution, the controversies involving the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments to meet the new American industrialism.

HST 380. America at Work (#H). T/R 11:00-12:15. A-103. Gillespie. The history of working people in American is one of the most unique in the world.  The U.S. boasts some of the most successful and innovative entrepreneurial and industrial leaders in modern history, as well as some of the bloodiest, exploitative and divisive of labor relations.  This complex set of histories has always been and continues to be interconnected with global developments.  To look at the history of people in the American workplace and the meanings Americans have attached to leadership, management, and workers is to gain critical insight into political and social systems in the U.S. and the wider world.  This course will examine the history of people at work in America from multiple perspectives beginning with the 17th century up to the present.

HST 381. Religious Utopias and the American Experience (3h). TR 12:30-1:45. B-117. Frank. Religious groups of many different origins — Moravians, Shakers, Rappites, Transcendentalists, Koreshans — have created settlements in North America that would embody their ideals. This course surveys a range of such 18th and 19th-century communities that raise provocative questions about the nature of community in America, the organization of a free society, and the role of religion in shaping human lives. The course examines the plan of daily life in these settlements – land use, building types, gender relations, children, labor, education, the arts, religious ritual and symbol, leadership and polity. We put their practices into critical conversation with the emerging dominant culture of America that has often dismissed them as merely “utopian” and thus overlooked what may be learned from their experience.

HST 390A. Research Seminar: Decolonization in the Twentieth Century (3h). T 2:00-4:30. B-116. Sinanaglou.   At the start of World War II in 1939, approximately one-third of the world’s population lived under European colonial rule. By the end of the twentieth century, that number had dropped to less than one percent. This research seminar will examine the process of decolonization in the twentieth century, comparing and contrasting the end of European empires in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Carribean. Themes addressed will include the roles of violent and non-violent resistance, European domestic politics and international agreements, cultural imperialism and post-colonial immigration. We will ask why decolonization was sudden in some places and protracted in others, consensual and relatively peaceful in certain territories and explosively divisive in others. The course will conclude with an examination of the legacy of empire and decolonization in the contemporary world, and of the persistence of imperialism in the twenty-first century.

HST 390B. Research Seminar: Stalinism (3h). W 2:00-4:30. A-104. Rupp. The course explores the political, socio-economic and cultural changes associated with the Stalinist era, with students writing a research paper on a topic of their choosing that focuses on some aspect of Stalinism.

HST 390C. Research Seminar: Race, Class, Gender and Resistance in the American South (3h). T 2:00-4:30. A-104. Gillespie. Students will design, research, and write an original paper (25-30 pp.) by examining institutions, movements, or social groups in the history of the American South that used resistance against enforced or established authority in pursuit of change.  Research topics might include resistance to slavery; oppositional strategies by apprentices and indentured servants from desertion to violence; protests for workers’ rights and the organization of unions; the rise of populism and other third party political movements; the celebration of Emancipation Day and the anti-lynching campaign; civil disobedience and protest during the Civil Rights Movement; the fight for the E.R.A.; the struggle for immigrant rights; neighborhood and community resistance movements; environmental activism aimed at changing local corporate practice; etc.

HST 390D. Research Seminar: Slavery, Memory, and Narrative (3h). R 2:00-4:30. A-104. Parent. Examines the narratives of ex-slaves and free blacks.  The seminar begins with readings on the methodology of memory, memoirs, and autobiography before moving to tutorials.  Students will be able to draw on several printed primary and Internet collections for their research papers.

HST 391A. Honors Seminar (3h). R 2:00-4:30. B-116. Escott. The Honors Seminar is required for majors in History who are seeking departmental honors.  It features intensive examination and discussion of important pieces of historical scholarship, and in this semester’s seminar the readings will focus on the history of slavery and segregation in the United States.  (Please note that this seminar is different from and in addition to the writing of an honors research paper.)

FIRST YEAR SEMINARS

FYS 100. The Sectional Crisis, 1820-1860. TR 9:30-10:45. A-103. Escott. This course focuses on the development of the sectional crisis in US politics between 1820 and 1860.  Important political developments will be covered along with key topics such as reform movements, economic development, and cultural divergence.  The course will challenge students to consider causes of the crisis, how it was handled, and social and institutional factors that affected its outcome.  Historians’ viewpoints will be used to frame the analysis of important questions.  Reading assignments will focus on both primary sources and arguments by historians.

FYS 100. Power and Dissent in Modern Arabic Literature.  TR 2:00-3:15. A-305. Wilkins.

Spring 2012

100 Level Courses

History 101A & 101B. Western Civilization to 1700 (3h). TR 8-9:15 & 9:30-10:45. B-117. Williams. At light speed (in one class period) we will traverse the prehistory of our species and then set about a more intensive review of the next 5200 years (3500 B.C.E to 1700 C.E). Our journey will carry us from Sumeria and the appearance of that form of culture historians call civilization to the eve of industrialization and political revolution in Western Europe. While examining the the communal structures, achievements, tribulations, and transformations of peoples who, for the most part, spoke Indo-European languages and who, from their origins somewhere north of the Caucasus, came to control not only Europe, but the Americas and the whole of northern Asia, we will try to determine what sense it makes to speak of the tangible and intangible worlds they made as a single civilization and on what bases we might distinguish this civilization from others that appeared elsewhere.

History 102A. Europe & World in Modern Era (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-102. Hughes. Human beings have faced certain perennial problems as they tried to live their lives in complex societies. We’ll explore their efforts to come to grips with these problems by focusing on a historically important but culturally diverse area of the world, the Mediterranean basin and its outliers, over an extended period of time. Some of the problems that will concern us in the course are: the nature of divinity and people’s relationship to the divine; the nature of evil; the nature and sources of human knowledge; the organization and legitimation of political power. Two particular emphases will be environmental history (why did the Mediterranean remain a center of world power for 4500 years—and then become a backwater?) and cultural development and interaction (why and how did human groups develop different cultures within similar, neighboring environments and how did their interaction with one another affect their development?). Americans are, perforce, cultural heirs to this part of the world, and a study of its development should give you some understanding of how the culture you live in—and some of your own attitudes and values—came to be.

History 102B. Europe & World in Modern Era (3h). TR 9:30-10:45. A-208. Sinanoglou. This course offers an introduction to the history of Europe from the Old Regime to the early twenty-first century. We explore social, economic, political, cultural and intellectual history, engaging with themes such as the structures and functions of government and society, the role of international relations in shaping domestic, regional and global politics, the relationship of people to modes of production and consumption, the influence of ideas on political, economic and social life, and the position of individuals in relation to communities and states. Using both a textbook, which looks back from a distance and pulls together a coherent narrative, and primary sources, which are produced in particular historical moments, we track, analyze and debate that central concern of historical scholarship: change over time.

History 103A & 103B. World Civilizations to 1500 (3h). MWF 9:00-9:50 & 11:00 – 11:50. A208. Lerner. (Freshman only). The course surveys the social, political and cultural development of a variety of world civilizations from their inception to 1500. The focus concerns a detailed analysis of those civilizations, which represent the most spectacular example of social formation: the relationship between the individual and deity as a religious expression; the relationship between society and nature as a philosophical dilemma; and the relationship between the individual and society as a cultural and political manifestation. In each case, the unifying theme we shall explore is how these peoples organized themselves politically, economically, socially as a response to their particular geographical and environmental condition. We shall see that the legacy of these civilizations is one of cultural syncretism manifested in the diversity and complexity of their traditions and ideas.  Enrollment is open to Freshman only.

History 105A & 105B. Africa in World History (3h). MWF 12:00-12:50 & 1:00-1:50. A-102. Parent. Parent. Course examines the role Africa and Africans have played in world history from prehistory to the present, as experienced and understood by Africans themselves. Their traditions, religions, migrations, economies, and civilizations have all developed in relationship to other regions and peoples of the world. The pressures of the Mediterranean, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean economies, the slave trades, and colonial domination have elicited responses of accommodation, resistance, revolt and independence.

History 106A & 106B. Medieval World Civilizations (3h). MWF 11:00-11:50 & 12:00 – 12:50. A-103. O’Connell. This course provides an overview of world civilizations in the period generally understood as “medieval”—that is, from approximately 600 to 1600 C.E. The concept of a medieval, or middle, period in history originally came from European history, referring to the time between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance, or to a rebirth of classical knowledge. One of the questions of this course is to examine cultures and societies in east Asia, India, Africa, and the Americas as well as Europe during the same time frame and to ask if there is such a thing as a “medieval” world history. Are there patterns, transformations, and developments common to all these societies in the medieval period? What characteristics do these widely differing cultures and geographic areas share, and where do they differ?

History 107A & 107B. Middle East & The World (3h). MWF 10:00-10:50 & 11:00-11:50. A-103 & A-208.  Wilkins.