Post-Graduate

There are many post-graduate opportunities for individuals who intend to continue pursuing a career in Latin American and Latino Studies or who desire to further their knowledge in the field.  A partial list of fellowship or scholarship opportunities and graduate school programs is provided below.

Please contact Silvia Correa, Program Assistant, with updates as to recent publications or ongoing research for inclusion on this section of the website.

There are a variety of fellowship and scholarship opportunities available for highly motivated students interested in conducting research on or furthering their education in Latin American and Latino Studies. Below is a partial list of several of scholarship and fellowship programs that past Wake Forest students have been awarded. Students and recent graduates who are interested in and display the general prerequisites for any of these opportunities, should consult should contact Dr. Thomas O. Phillips, Director of the Wake Forest Scholars Program, as soon as possible.

Fulbright Scholars Programs

Fulbright Scholarships provide students with a bachelor’s degree the opportunity to study or affiliate for one year at a foreign institution for cultural exchange, course study, or degree candidacy, depending on the applicants home country. Approximately 1,400 grants are provided each year to over 140 countries worldwide. Requirements and competition vary from country to country, but most non-English-speaking host countries require competency in the host language.

The Fulbright Scholars Program also sponsors Fulbright Teaching Assistantships to select countries in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. These fellowships vary in requirement and competition, but typically provide a year of residence in a host country in exchange for teaching English. Fluency in the host country language is not a requirement in every case.

Also sponsored by Fulbright are grants in business, economics, international relations, and law to Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Uruguay. In addition the Fulbright Islamic Civilization Initiative Program encourages Fulbright grants to countries with considerable Muslim populations. The Critical Language Enhancement awards encourage highly capable candidates by providing language training in country prior to the commencement of one’s project.

Students talented in the creative and performing arts can apply to any country for a Fulbright Scholarship in their area of specialty. Guidelines vary from country to country. Performing arts proposals should focus on training and cultivating skill. Creative arts proposals might focus on collecting background information or conducting research for novels, short stories, or films, etc. Host country affiliations might include settings such as museums and galleries. Supplemental materials are typically required in the application and must be applicable to the proposed study or project. The Fulbright program encourages talented artists and writers to apply and share any works they have created with their respective host countries while funded by the scholarship.

3.5 is the recommended grade point average. Wake Forest seniors may apply only through nomination by Wake Forest. Candidates must notify the campus committee of their intention to apply for a Fullbright Scholarship by September 1st of their senior, though students are strongly encouraged to begin developing their study proposals in their junior year. Students interested should contact Dr. Phillips as soon as possible and as early as their sophomore year. Wake Forest has become a major Fulbright nomination and award institution. The most successful candidates will be those who engage Dr. Phillips and campus mentors early in the application process.

The Fullbright Scholarships are administered by the Institute for International Education and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.  U.S. students should visit the page of the Fullbright Program for U.S. Students, non-U.S. Students should visit the page of the Fullbright Program for Foreign Students, and individuals interested in a teaching position should visit the page of the Fullbright Language Teaching Assistant Program.

David L. Boren Fellowship Program

Boren Fellowships provide up to $30,000 to U.S. graduate students to add an important international and language component to their graduate education through specialization in area study, language study, or increased language proficiency. Boren Fellowships support study and research in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Boren Fellows represent a variety of academic and professional disciplines, but all are interested in studying less commonly taught languages.

Boren Fellowships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their projects, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined.  NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.

Interested students should contact Dr. Phillips as soon as possible and as early as their junior year. For more information, please visit the website of the Boren Awards for International Study.

Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Program

The Thomas R. Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship program provides funding to students preparing for a career with the U.S. Department of State and as a Foreign Service Officer. Women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and students with financial need are strongly encouraged to apply. Traditionally, candidates are participating in academic programs relevant to international affairs, political and economic analysis, administration, management, and science policy.

The Pickering Fellowship is funded by the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. The fellowship award covers the tuition, room, board, and mandatory fees of a recipients senior year of undergraduate study and their first year of graduate study.Reimbursement for books and some travel may be paid, pending the availability of funds. Fellows must commit to pursuing a graduate degree in international studies at one of the graduate schools participating in the program, that is, full member APSIA schools only. Participating graduate schools provide financial support in the second year of graduate study based on need.

Fellows must participate in one ten-week overseas and one ten-week domestic summer internship within the U.S. Department of State which provide students with valuable work experience in foreign affairs. Students receive a stipend during the internships. Guidance from a Foreign Service officer is provided during the graduate school segment of the program. Fellows must meet Department of State Foreign Service entry requirements and take both the Foreign Service Officer Test (FSOT) and the Foreign Service Oral Assessment (FSOA) at least once prior to the completion of the academic requirements for the Fellowship. Each successful candidate is obligated to a minimum of three years of service in an appointment as a Foreign Service Officer. Candidates must be able to obtain medical, security and suitability clearances in order to remain in the program. Candidates who do not successfully complete the fellowship program and fail to meet Foreign Service entry requirements may be subject to a reimbursement obligation to the U.S. Department of State. Applicants must be in their junior year of undergraduate study at the time of application and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

Interested students should contact Dr. Phillips as soon as possible. For more information, please visit the website of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program

The Rangel Program is a collaborative effort between Howard University and the U.S. State Department that seeks to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers as diplomats in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State. The program seeks individuals interested in helping to shape a freer, more secure and prosperous world through formulating, representing, and implementing U.S. foreign policy. The Program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service and those with financial need.

There are two major components to the Rangel Program: an International Affairs Graduate Fellowship Program that provides support for graduate school, professional development, and entry into the U.S. Foreign Service, and an undergraduate International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program that provides undergraduates with the opportunity to enhance their skills, knowledge and understanding about U.S. foreign policy. The Fellowship Program provides to the ten annual recipients internships and related opportunities in Washington, DC. Strong leadership skills and demonstrated financial need are two complements to a required exemplary academic record. 2.5 is the minimum suggested GPA.

Interested students should contact Dr. Phillips as soon as possible and should notify of the campus committee of their interest by October 1st. For more information, please visit the website of the Rangel Program.

Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholarship Program

Ambassadorial Scholarships, The Rotary Foundation’s oldest and best-known program, was founded in 1947. Since then, more than 40,000 men and women from about 100 nations have studied abroad under its auspices. Today it is one of the world’s largest privately funded international scholarships programs. Nearly 700 scholarships were awarded for study in 2009-10. Through grants totaling approximately US$16.2 million, recipients from about 70 countries studied in more than 80 nations.

The purpose of the Ambassadorial Scholarships program is to further international understanding and friendly relations among people of different countries and geographical areas. The program sponsors academic year scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students as well as for qualified professionals pursuing vocational studies. While abroad, scholars serve as goodwill ambassadors to the host country and give presentations about their homelands to Rotary clubs and other groups. Upon returning home, scholars share with Rotarians and others the experiences that led to a greater understanding of their host country.

Academic-Year Ambassadorial Scholarships provide a flat grant of US$27,000 for one academic year of study in another country. These awards are intended to help defray costs associated with round-trip transportation, tuition and other fees, room and board, and some educational supplies.

Interested applicants must apply for Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholarships through their local Rotary club but should contact Dr. Phillips to state their interest as soon as possible. For more information, please visit the website of Rotary International.

Smithsonian Institute Latino Studies Fellowship Program

The Latino Studies Fellowship Program provides opportunities to US Latino predoctoral students to pursue research topics that relate to Latino art, culture, and history. Interdisciplinary subjects are encouraged and can be undertaken at more than one of the Smithsonian museums and/or research units, and advised by one or more of the Smithsonian research staff members.  This program is intended to broaden and increase the body of Latino related research that is being conducted at the Smithsonian Institution. While not a condition of the award, fellows are invited to pursue a portion of their project in the field: at other museums or research facilities, as well as in communities where primary data can be collected. A research and travel allowance will be made available to cover additional costs of spending up to one third of the fellowship tenure away from the Smithsonian, if appropriate and necessary, but not at the fellow’s home institution.

Interested students should contact Dr. Phillips during their junior year. For more information, please visit the website of the Office of Fellowships and Internships at the Smithsonian Institute.

The Peace Corps

The Peace Corps traces its roots and mission to 1960, when then Senator John F. Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. From that inspiration grew an agency of the federal government devoted to world peace and friendship. Since that time, 200,000+ Peace Corps Volunteers have served in 139 host countries to work on issues ranging from AIDS education to information technology and environmental preservation. Today’s Peace Corps is more vital than ever, working in emerging and essential areas such as information technology and business development, and contributing to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Peace Corps Volunteers continue to help countless individuals who want to build a better life for themselves, their children, and their communities.

The Peace Corps has three simple goals: help the people of interested countries in meeting their need for trained men and women, help promote a better understanding of Americans on the part of the peoples served, and help promote a better understanding of other peoples on the part of Americans.

Peace Corps Volunteers must be American citizens and typically posses a college degree. Volunteers work abroad with governments, schools, non-profit organizations, non-government organizations, and entrepreneurs in education, hunger, business, information technology, agriculture, and the environment for a period of 24 months after 3 months of training.

Interested students should contact Dr. Phillips or the Office of Career Services as soon as possible. For more information, please visit the website of the Peace Corps.

There are many opportunities for students interested in furthering their academic education in Latin American and Latino studies beyond the minor. Below is a partial list of the U.S. universities that award M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Latin American, Latino, and/or Caribbean Studies. Many other universities offer graduate certificates or minors at both the M.A. and Ph.D. levels. Students intending to apply to graduate school should consult a faculty member of the Program in their specific major or field of interest. Wake Forest also works with Georgetown University to offer Latin American and Latino Studies minors the opportunity to begin working towards a M.A. degree during their undergraduate years through a five-year cooperative program.

Georgetown University
Center for Latin American Studies, Walsh School of Foreign Service
M.A. in Latin American Studies
See information about Wake Forest University’s Five-Year B.A./M.A. Cooperative Program with Georgetown University….

California State University, Los Angeles
Latin American Studies Program
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

Columbia University
Institute of Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
More information…

Florida International University
Latin American and Carribean Center, School of International and Public Affairs
M.A. in Latin American and Carribean Center
More information…

Fordham University
Latin American and Latino Studies Institute
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

Indiana University, Bloomington
Center for Latin American and Carribean Studies
M.A. in Latin American and Carribean Studies
More information…

John Hopkins University
Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information….

New York University
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
More information…

Ohio State University
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information….

Ohio University
Latin American Studies Program
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

Stanford University
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

State University of New York at Albany
Latin American, Caribbean, and US Latino Studies Program
M.A. in Latin American and Carribean Studies
More information…

Tulane University
Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
Ph.D. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of California, Los Angeles
Latin American Institute
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of California, San Diego
Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of Chicago
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of California, Santa Barbara
Latin American and Iberian Studies Program
M.A. in Latin American and Iberian Studies
More information…

University of Connecticut, Storrs
Center for Latin American and Carribean Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of Florida, Gainesville
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of Illinois, Urbana -Champaign
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information….

University of Kansas, Lawrence
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of Miami
Latin American Studies Program
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Latin American and Iberian Institute
M.A. in Latin American Studies
Ph.D. in Latin American Studies
More information…

University of Texas, Austin
Teresa Long Institute of Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
Ph.D. in Latin American Studies
More information…

Vanderbilt University
Center for Latin American Studies
M.A. in Latin American Studies
More information…

Career opportunities are available for Latin American and Latino Studies minors in all fields. In the past, minors have gone on to pursue careers in a wide range of fields, including academia, government and politics, business, education, foreign service and diplomacy, science, medicine, and law. Students who seek a career related to Latin American and Latino Studies should consult the Office of Career Services. A partial list of undergraduate internship opportunities can be found on the Internship section of the website.