Courses

Summer 2017

LIN-ANT 150 “Introduction to Linguistics”
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (Division IV credit)
Dr. Bender, MTWRF 10:50-12:05 pm (5/23-6/29)

Fall 2017

LIN-ANT 150 “Introduction to Linguistics”
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (Division IV credit)
Dr. Alarcón, MWF 10-10:50 am / MWF 11-11:50 am

ANT-EDU 353 “Language in Education”
This seminar explores the role of language in educational contexts; includes the study of bilingual and bicultural education, second language education, crosscultural education, and communication in the classroom. Includes a servicelearning component.
Dr. Bender, TR 12:30-1:45 pm

SPA 371 “Contrastive Spanish/ English Grammar and Stylistics”
Advanced study of structure and style in a variety of Spanish texts, with an indepth approach to idiomatic expressions and some back/cross translation exercises. (In Spanish)
Dr. González, MW 2-3:15 pm

ENG 309 “Modern English Grammar”
“Modern English Grammar” offers a fun, rigorous exploration of how English grammar works. Based in a linguistics approach to grammar study, the course invites students to expand their knowledge about English grammar (and language more generally) while critically exploring such fraught issues as grammatical change and variation, the origins and effects of grammar prescriptions, the place of grammar instruction in education, and the politics of language authority.
Dr. Lancaster, TR 2-3:15 pm

SPA 320 “Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics”
Survey of the core areas in Hispanic linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Basic concepts and methodology of linguistic analysis as preparation for further study in the field. (In Spanish)
Dr. Alarcón, TR 2-3:15 pm

Spring 2017

LIN-ANT 150 “Introduction to Linguistics”
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (Division IV credit) Dr. Bender MWF 11-11:50 am / MWF 12-12:50

LIN 340 “Special Topics: Obscenities”
Is there a set of words in every language that we are not allowed to say? Does that set change across time, even across the life span of one of us? Do we know why such sets exist, and why they change? Dr. Hamilton MWF 9-9:50

LIN 383 “Language Engineering”
Introduction to the process of making a product linguistically and culturally appropriate to the target locale, and to computer-assisted terminology management. Surveys applications in translation technology. Dr. Burgos W 3:30-6

LIN-PHI 375 “Philosophy of Language”
Study of such philosophical issues about language as truth and meaning, reference and description, proper names, indexicals, modality, tense, the semantic paradoxes, and the differences between languages and other sorts of sign systems. Dr. Glezakos W 3:30-6:00

ENG 306 “Interaction in Language: Intro to Written Discourse Studies ”
Analysis of theoretical traditions in discourse studies, including Pragmatics, Analysis of Institutional Talk, Genre Analysis, and Corpus Linguistics, designed to provide students with new approaches and tools with which to question, investigate, and critique how language works in discourses that are meaningful to them. Dr. Lancaster WF 11-12:15

SPA 379 “Special Topics: Language and Society”
Introduction to the study of Spanish sociolinguistics, focusing on core issues about language use in social contexts in Spanish-speaking communities including socio-economic status, gender, and age, language attitudes, language policies and planning, and language and identity. (In Spanish) Dr. Alarcón MW 2-3:15

GER 345 “The History of the German Language”
Explore ancient Germanic languages and a variety of texts and discover the sound shifts that shaped Modern German. Learn about German dialects in Germany and in the U.S. (In English) Dr. Wiggers MWF 1-1:50

Fall 2015

LIN-ANT 150. Introduction to Linguistics
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (CD, D)
TR 11:00-12:15 Dr. Bender
MWF 9:00-9:50 am Dr. Hamilton

ENG 309/HON 365: Modern English Grammar
“Modern English Grammar” offers a fun, rigorous exploration of how English grammar works. Based in a linguistics approach to grammar study, the course invites students to expand their knowledge about English grammar (and language more generally) while critically exploring such fraught issues as grammatical change and variation, the origins and effects of grammar prescriptions, the place of grammar instruction in education, and the politics of language authority.
TR 2:00–3:15 Dr. Lancaster

SPA 320. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Survey of the core areas in Hispanic linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Basic concepts and methodology of linguistic analysis as preparation for further study in the field.
MW 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Alarcón

337. TESOL Linguistics
Introduces the theoretical and practical linguistics resources and skills for teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) within the US or abroad. Also listed as EDU 337.
MW 2:00-3:15 pm Dr. Alarcon

FRH 343. Modern French
Study of the features of contemporary French including colloquial French contrasting grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation with standard forms.
WF 11:00-12:15 pm Dr. Pellet

354. Field Methods in Linguistic Anthropology (4h)
Trains students in basic skills of collecting and analyzing linguistic data at the levels of phonetics-phonology, grammar, lexico-semantics, discourse, and sociocultural context. Students will learn about the research questions that drive linguistic fieldwork as well as the relevant methods, tools, and practical and ethical concerns.
TR 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Bender

SPA 371. Contrastive English/Spanish Grammar and Stylistics
Advanced study of structure and style in a variety of Spanish texts, with an in-depth approach to idiomatic expressions and some back/cross translation exercises.
MW 2:00-3:15 pm Dr. Gonzalez

ENG 390. The Structure of English
An introduction to the principles and techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English.
WF 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Aull

Fall 2016

LIN-ANT 150 “Introduction to Linguistics”
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (Division IV credit)
Dr. Hamilton MWF 9-9:50 am / Dr. Pellet TR 11-12:15 pm

LIN 330 “Introduction to Psycholinguistics and Language Acquisition”
Psychological and linguistic study of the mental processes underlying the acquisition and use of language; how children acquire the structure of language and how adults make use of linguistic systems. (Neuroscience elective)
Dr. Alarcón MWF 9-9:50 am

SPA 322 “Spanish Pronunciation and Dialect Variation”
Description of, and practice with, the sounds, rhythm, and intonation of Spanish and the differences from English, with special attention to social and regional diversity. Strongly recommended for improving pronunciation.
Dr. J. Francom TR 9:30-10:45 am

LIN-ANT 333 “Language and Gender”
Uses an anthropological perspective to examine relationships between language structure, language use, persons, and social categories.
Dr. Bender TR 11-12:15 pm

LIN 380 “Language Use & Technology”
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of creating and accessing large linguistic corpora (electronic collections of “real world” text) for linguistic inquiry. Course surveys a variety of cross-discipline efforts that employ corpus data for research and explores current applications.
Dr. J. Francom TR 12:30-1:45 pm

ENG 390 “The Structure of English”
An introduction to the principles and techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English.
Dr. Aull WF 2-3:15 pm

 

Spring 2016

LIN-ANT 150. Introduction to Linguistics
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (CD, D)
MWF 9-9:50am Dr. Hamilton
TTH 12:30-1:45pm Dr. J. Francom

310. Sociolinguistics & Dialectology
Study of variation in language: effects of regional background, social class, ethnic group, gender, and setting; social attitudes toward language; outcomes of linguistic conflicts in the community; evolution of research methods for investigating language differences and the diffusion of change.
MW 2-3:15pm Dr. C. Francom

340. Special Topics: American Generalizations
American Generalizations, invites students to investigate how the language of American magazines over the past 100 years has, for better and for worse, created particular cultural and national narratives. The course counts toward the Linguistics minor and also the English major and the Writing Minor.
MW 2-3:15pm Dr. Aull

340. Special Topics: Language Proficiency
We will examine how language proficiency is defined by various organizations and companies that provide proficiency tests, and will compare how the tests are constructed, administered, and used. In addition, we will explore the intersection of language proficiency and intercultural competence through the research being done by the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and will consider different methods for assessing intercultural development in college students.
TTH 12:30-1:45pm Dr. Ross

383. Language Engineering
Introduction to the process of making a product linguistically and culturally appropriate to the target locale, and to computer-assisted terminology management. Surveys applications in translation technology.
W 3:30-6pm Dr. Burgos

610. Sociolinguistics & Dialectology
Study of variation in language: effects of regional background, social class, ethnic group, gender, and setting; social attitudes toward language; outcomes of linguistic conflicts in the community; evolution of research methods for investigating language differences and the diffusion of change.
MW 2-3:15pm Dr. Judy

683. Language Engineering
Introduction to the process of making a product linguistically and culturally appropriate to the target locale, and to computer-assisted terminology management. Surveys applications in translation technology.
W 3:30-6pm Dr. Rosenburg
W 3:30-6pm Dr. Zhu

Fall 2015

LIN-ANT 150. Introduction to Linguistics
The social phenomenon of language: how it originated and developed, how it is learned and used, its relationship to other kinds of behavior; language (oral, written, signed) and language families; analysis of linguistic data; and social issues of language use. (CD, D)
TR 11:00-12:15 Dr. Bender
MWF 9:00-9:50 am Dr. Hamilton

ENG 309/HON 365: Modern English Grammar
“Modern English Grammar” offers a fun, rigorous exploration of how English grammar works. Based in a linguistics approach to grammar study, the course invites students to expand their knowledge about English grammar (and language more generally) while critically exploring such fraught issues as grammatical change and variation, the origins and effects of grammar prescriptions, the place of grammar instruction in education, and the politics of language authority.
TR 2:00–3:15 Dr. Lancaster

SPA 320. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Survey of the core areas in Hispanic linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language variation. Basic concepts and methodology of linguistic analysis as preparation for further study in the field.
MW 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Alarcón

337. TESOL Linguistics
Introduces the theoretical and practical linguistics resources and skills for teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) within the US or abroad. Also listed as EDU 337.
MW 2:00-3:15 pm Dr. Alarcon

FRH 343. Modern French
Study of the features of contemporary French including colloquial French contrasting grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation with standard forms.
WF 11:00-12:15 pm Dr. Pellet

354. Field Methods in Linguistic Anthropology (4h)
Trains students in basic skills of collecting and analyzing linguistic data at the levels of phonetics-phonology, grammar, lexico-semantics, discourse, and sociocultural context. Students will learn about the research questions that drive linguistic fieldwork as well as the relevant methods, tools, and practical and ethical concerns.
TR 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Bender

SPA 371. Contrastive English/Spanish Grammar and Stylistics
Advanced study of structure and style in a variety of Spanish texts, with an in-depth approach to idiomatic expressions and some back/cross translation exercises.
MW 2:00-3:15 pm Dr. Gonzalez

ENG 390. The Structure of English
An introduction to the principles and techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English.
WF 12:30-1:45 pm Dr. Aull