Courses

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The Department of Music offers everything from introductory courses for students with little or no musical background, to advanced specialized courses for the music major, as well as a variety of musical ensembles and performance opportunities open to all students (not just music majors and minors).

Below is a list of courses and course descriptions offered in a typical semester. This information can also be found in the Undergraduate Bulletin.

See our Current Student Resources page to download printable course requirement checklists for both majors.

General Music

101. Introduction to Western Music. (3h) Basic theoretical concepts and musical terminology. Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from the Middle Ages through the present day. May not count toward the majors or minor in music. (D)

104. Basic Music Reading and Skills. (1.5h) Study of the fundamentals of music theory including key signatures, scales, intervals, chords, and basic sight-singing and ear-training skills. Designed for students wishing to participate in University ensembles and those wishing to pursue vocal, instrumental, and compositional instruction. May not count toward the majors or minor in music.

109. Introduction to the Music of World Cultures. (3h) Survey of music in selected societies around the world. Topics selected from the following areas of concentration: India, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, western Europe, Latin America, and vernacular music of the United States (including jazz). May not count toward the majors or minor in music. Credit cannot be received for both MUS 109 and 209. (CD, D)

131. The World of Musical Instruments. (3h) Historical survey of musical instruments by families. Instruments of Western art music, selected world cultures, and vernacular music of the U.S., as well as electronic instruments. Emphasis on the cultural, sociological, and technological as well as the musical aspects of instruments. Credit cannot be received for both MUS 131 and 231. (D)

Music in Liberal Arts

100. Recitals. (0h) Recitals, concerts, and guest lectures sponsored by the Department of Music and the Secrest Artists Series. (Specific attendance requirements are established at the beginning of each semester.) Four semesters are required of music majors; three semesters are required of
music minors. Pass/Fail only.

106. Electronic Music Lab. (1.5h) Foundations of MIDI protocol, with particular attention to the study and application of sequencers, notational programs, and synthesizers. Development of skills in written notation through use of computerized programs. Taught in the Music Computer Lab. P—MUS 101, 104, or POI.

130. African-American Art Song. (3h) Survey of the art songs of African-American composers of the nineteenth and twentieth century. Emphasis on song for solo voice and piano, with some discussion of works for voice and orchestra or chamber ensemble. P—POI. (CD)

171. Music Theory I. (4h) Music fundamentals (key signatures, scales, modes, intervals, chords), simple part-writing, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. Prerequisite for the audition in music performance. Designed for music majors and minors. Offered in fall.

172. Music Theory II. (4h) Seventh chords, secondary chords, altered chords, part-writing, basic counterpoint, basic musical forms, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. Offered in spring. P—MUS 171.

173. Music Theory III. (4h) Altered chords, continuation of part-writing, eighteenth and nineteenth century forms, ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythmic skills, and keyboard harmony. Offered in fall. P—MUS 172.

174. Music Theory IV. (4h) Expanded harmony and techniques from Impressionism to the present. New concepts of style and form. Ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythmic skills, and keyboard harmony. Offered in spring. P—MUS 173.

181. Music History I. (3h) History of western art music from the ancient Greeks to 1750. It is recommended that students take MUS 171 before enrolling in MUS 181. Reading knowledge of music is essential. Offered in fall. (D)

182. Music History II. (3h) History of western art music from 1750 to World War I. It is recommended that students take MUS 171 before enrolling in MUS 182. Reading knowledge of music is essential. P—MUS 171 or POI. Offered in spring. (D)

183. Music History III. (3h) History of western art music from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present day and its associations with other cultures and disciplines. It is recommended that students take MUS 171 before enrolling in MUS 183. Reading knowledge of music is essential. P—MUS 171 or POI. Offered in fall. (D)

203. History of Jazz. (3h) Survey of American jazz from its origin to the present. P—POI. (D)

207. American Music. (3h) Study of the musical sources of American culture and the six streams of music in the U.S.: folk and ethnic musics, offsprings of the rural South (country music, blues, rock), jazz and its forerunners, popular sacred music, popular secular music, and art music. (CD, D)

208. Women and Music. (3h) Historical overview of women musicians in society. (CD, D)

209. Music of World Cultures. (3h) Survey of music in selected societies around the world. Topics selected from the following areas of concentration: India, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, western Europe, Latin America, and vernacular music of the United States (including jazz). Students complete a project or projects on the technical or theoretical aspects of the music of world cultures. Designed for music majors and minors. Credit cannot be received for both MUS 109 and 209. P—MUS 172 or POI. (CD, D)

210. Survey of Latin-American Music. (3h) Survey of art, folk, and popular musical styles in Latin America and their impact on music of other cultures. Divided into three areas of study: the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. (CD, D)
212. Music in the Church. (3h) Function of church musicians and the relationship of their work to the church program. Offers to musician and non-musician alike historical overview, hymnody survey and other church music-related topics through class and guest lectures and practical seminars. Offered fall semester of odd years. P—POI.

213. Beethoven. (3h) Compositional process, analysis, criticism, and performance practices in selected works by Ludwig van Beethoven. P—POI. (D)

215. Philosophy of Music. (3h) Survey of philosophical writings about music. Musical aesthetics; social, religious, and political concerns.

220. Seminar in Music History. (3h) Intensive study of a selected topic in music history. P—MUS 174, 181, 182, 183, or POI.

231. The World of Musical Instruments. (3h) Historical survey of musical instruments by families. Instruments of Western art music, selected world cultures, and vernacular music of the U.S., as well as electronic instruments. Emphasis on the cultural, sociological, and technological as well as the musical aspects of instruments. Students complete a project or projects on the technical or theoretical aspects of instruments. Designed for music majors or minors. Credit cannot be
received for both MUS 131 and 231. P—MUS 171 or POI. (D)

272. Performance and Analysis. (1.5h) Practical analysis for use in research and performance preparation. P—MUS 174 or POI.

273. Composition. (1h or 1.5h) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. May be repeated for credit. P—POI.

280. Orchestration. (3h) Study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how composers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical scoring and manuscript skills. Offered in spring. P—MUS 174, 182 and 183; or POI.

282. Conducting. (3h) Study of choral and instrumental conducting techniques. P—MUS 174 or POI.

283. The Roots of Song. (3h) Interdisciplinary investigation of poetry and song in the Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Study of the evolution of poetic and musical genres and styles, both sacred and secular. Students must complete a project or projects on the technical or theoretical aspects of early song. Students may not receive credit for both MUS 283 and ENG 313.

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3h) Survey of repertoire, including an examination of teaching materials in the student’s special area of interest. (D)

a. orchestral literature d. guitar literature
b. choral literature e. vocal literature
c. piano literature f. opera

285. Special Topics in Music. (1-3h) Intensive study of a selected subject chosen by faculty prior to the term in which the course is offered. May be repeated if course content differs. P—POI.

307. American Foundations. (3h) Interdisciplinary study of American art, music, literature, and social history with particular reference to the art collection at Reynolda House Museum of American Art. Lectures, discussions, and field trips, including a tour of New York City museums. Term project in American music. Also listed as ART 331, HST 349, and HON 393, 394. Offered at Reynolda House in summer only.

Independent Study, Senior Project, and Honors Project

298. Independent Study. (1.5h, 3h) Project in an area of study not otherwise available in the department. By pre-arrangement with department chair.

397. Senior Project. (3h) Writing and public presentation of a major composition, research paper, music analysis, or conducting endeavor, according to criteria on file in the department. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 397 and 398. By prearrangement.

398. Senior Honors Project. (3h) Writing and public presentation of a major composition, research paper, music analysis, or conducting endeavor, according to criteria on file in the department. A student may not receive credit for both MUS

397 and 398. P—Faculty selectionfor honors in music.

Ensembles

Departmental ensembles are open to all students on the basis of one hour per semester of participation in each ensemble, except as noted. Neither MUS 128 nor MUS 129 may count for the music majors or minor. All classes in this section may be repeated for credit.

111. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and contemporary operatic works. P—POI.

112. Collegium Musicum Instrumental. Ensemble stressing the performance practices and the performance of music of the medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras.

113. Orchestra. Study and performance of orchestral works from the classical and contemporary repertoire. P—Audition.

114. Collegium Musicum Vocal. Ensemble stressing the performance practices and the performance of music of the medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. P—Audition.

115. Concert Choir. Select touring choir of forty-five voices which performs a variety of choral literature from all periods. P—Audition.

116. Choral Union. A large, mixed chorus which performs a variety of choral literature from all periods. P—Audition.

118. Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for mixed chamber ensemble of winds, brass, and percussion. P—Audition.

119. Symphonic Band. (1h) Study and performance of music for symphonic band. Meets once weekly for ninety minutes. Performs on campus.

120. Chamber Music. Study and performance of chamber works. Performers are strongly urged to participate in a larger ensemble as well. P—POI.
a. percussion e. mixed i. keyboard
b. string f. clarinet
c. brass g. saxophone
d. woodwind h. guitar

121. Jazz Ensemble. Study and performance of written and improvised jazz for a twenty-member ensemble.

124. Small Ensemble. Study and performance of conducted works for small ensemble. Performers are strongly urged to participate in a larger ensemble as well. P—POI.

a. percussion ensemble e. brass choir
b. flute choir f. vocal ensemble
c. clarinet choir g. mixed ensemble
d. saxophone ensemble

128. Athletic Band I. Performs at most football games and men’s and women’s home basketball games. Meets twice weekly. Regular performances on and off campus. Offered in fall.

129. Athletic Band II. (0.5h) Performs at men’s and women’s home basketball games, and at the spring football game. Class held once weekly. Meets from the beginning of the semester to spring break. P—MUS 128 or POI.

Performance Study

Courses in individual instruction are open to students with the permission of the instructor on a space available-basis. Students in individual instruction who do not have basic knowledge of notation and rhythm are advised to enroll in MUS 104 either prior to or in conjunction with individual instruction. (See the fee section of this bulletin for specific information regarding cost.)

**All classes in this section may be repeated for credit unless noted.**

108. Alexander Technique for Musical Performers. (0.5h) Educational process that uses verbal and tactile feedback to teach improved use of the student’s body by identifying and changing poor and inefficient habits that cause stress, fatigue, and pain in the musical performer. Designed to teach the performer to minimize physical effort and maximize expression. Meets two hours per
week. Pass/Fail only.

122. Music Theatre Practicum. (1h) For musicians who perform in a departmentally-sponsored theatrical production (when their performance is not as a member of a departmental ensemble). May not be counted toward the majors or minor in music. Credit may be earned in a given semester for either MUS 122 or THE 283, but not both. Course may be repeated for no more than four hours. Pass/Fail only. P—POI.

123. Woodwind Doubling. (1h) Practical skills for woodwind instrumentalists who participate in musical theatre productions for which expertise on more than one instrument is required.

161. Individual Instruction. (0.5h) Technical studies and repertoire of progressive difficulty selected to meet the needs and abilities of the student. One half-hour lesson per week. Does not fulfill the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. May be repeated for credit. P—POI.
a. violin h. bassoon o. organ u. accompanying
b. viola i. saxophone p. piano v. voice
c. cello j. trumpet q. percussion w. recorder
d. bass k. French horn r. guitar x. viola da gamba
e. flute l. trombone s. harp y. harpsichord
f. oboe m. baritone t. electric bass z. jazz improvisation
g. clarinet n. tuba

162. Individual Instruction. (1h) One one-hour lesson per week. Does not fulfill the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. May be repeated for credit. P—POI.

165j. Brass Rudiments. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamentals of playing brass instruments. Designed for students with musical experience as well as beginners with no prior musical training. Offered in spring. P—POI.

165p. Class Piano. (0.5h) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, with emphasis on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed for the beginning piano student.

165q. Class Percussion. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamentals of playing percussion instruments. Includes an introduction to reading music as well as basic techniques on instruments of the percussion family. P—POI.

165r. Class Guitar I. (0.5h) For beginner students. Introduction to finger style guitar techniques: strumming, plucking, arpeggios and damping. Reading and playing from musical notation. Nylon string guitar is required.

166r. Class Guitar II. (0.5h) Continuation of finger style guitar techniques with emphasis on chordal progressions, scales, accompanying patterns and sight-reading. Nylon string guitar is required. P—MUS 165r.

165v. Class Voice I. (0.5h) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing, concepts of breath control, tone, and resonance. P—POI.

166v. Class Voice II. (0.5h) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P—MUS 165v or POI.

166p. Class Piano II. (0.5h) Continuation of fundamental piano techniques.
P—MUS 165p or POI.

167v. Theatrical Singing I: Class Voice. (0.5h) Basic techniques of singing, breath control, phonation, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. Study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. (One hour per week.) P—POI.
168v. Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice. (0.5h) Continuation of theatrical singing techniques with increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. P—MUS 167v or POI. (One hour per week.)

175v. Advanced Voice Class. (1h) Development of advanced vocal technique and repertoire. Limited to eight students. Two hours per week; may be repeated. P—MUS 166v or POI.

177v. Advanced Theatrical Singing. (1h) Development of advanced theatrical singing technique and performance of musical theatre repertoire. Limited to eight students. Two hours per week; may be repeated. P—MUS 168v or POI.

190. Diction for Singers. (1.5h) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on modification of English; pronunciation of Italian, German, and French. Development of articulatory and aural
skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet. Individual performance and coaching in class. (Two hours per week.) May not be repeated for credit.

262. Individual Instruction. (1.5h) One one-hour lesson per week. Fulfills the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. May be repeated for credit. P—Two hours of MUS 161 and/or 162, plus successful completion of the audition for the major in musical performance, and POI.

362. Senior Recital. (3h) Preparation and public performance of a recital. Fulfills the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. To be taken only during the senior year. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 362 and 363. A student may not enroll in MUS 262 and 362 in the same semester. May not be repeated for credit. P—Two semesters of MUS 262 and POI.
363. Senior Honors Recital. (3h) Preparation and public performance of a recital at the honors level. Fulfills the individual instruction requirements for the major in music performance. To be taken only during the senior year. A student may not receive credit for both MUS 362 and 363. A student may not enroll in MUS 262 and 363 in the same semester. May not be repeated for credit. P—Faculty selection for honors in music.