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2016-department-photoWe are one of the largest majors on campus, with course offerings that span the globe. Our faculty members are active researchers who, through their teaching, seek to develop students who are critical thinkers and effective writers. Our majors go on to work in government, business, law, policy, and non-profits, both here and abroad.

This website is designed to help you find out more about our course offerings, our faculty and their interests, our students, and our alumni. We hope you find what you are looking for. If not, please feel free to contact us.

Department of Politics and International Affairs
Wake Forest University
Kirby Hall 314A
P.O. Box 7568, Winston-Salem, NC 27109
Phone: (336) 758.5449 | FAX: (336) 758.6104 | Email: wfupol@wfu.edu

 

News

Exile, Interpretation and Strauss’ Dispute with Löwith –

11/28/17: 5:00-6:30, Kirby HallExile, Interpretation and Strauss' Dispute with Lowith

On Tuesday, November 28, 2018 from 5:30 – 6:30 pm, David Weinstein will be speaking in Kirby Hall 120. His topic will be: Exile, Interpretation and Strauss’ Dispute with Löwith. Sponsored by the Department of Politics & International Affairs, the Department of Philosophy, and the Jewish Studies Program.

David Weinstein is the author and co-editor of several books on British moral philosophy with Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press.  His Jewish Exiles and European Thought in the Shadow of the Third Reich, co-authored with Avihu Zakai, appeared with Cambridge University Press in August.  Weinstein is Emeritus Professor at Wake Forest University, USA and Honorarprofessor, Institut für Philosophie, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany.

Nick Kean – 2017 Pi Sigma Alpha National Student Research Conference


Last February, I was invited to represent Wake Forest at the 2017 Pi Sigma Alpha National Student Research Conference. At the conference, students from universities all over the country were invited to present research they have been conducting as undergraduates.

The presentation panels were divided up in categories of Comparative Politics, International Relations, American Politics and Public Policy. The panels were made up of three or four undergraduate presenters and one panel chair. The chairpersons were political science graduate students from Georgetown and George Washington University, and they offered valuable insights into our work as well as recommendations on how our research can be improved. I was a member of the final panel on Comparative Politics, where I had the opportunity to present my Senior Seminar Research Paper I had been working on with Dr. Wei-chin Lee, titled The International Criminal Court in Africa: Responding to Shortcomings and Accusations of Bias.

Our lunchtime speaker was Max Fisher of the New York Times and writer of The Interpreter, a newsletter using political and social science to examine and explain topics in international politics. He offered terrific insights into how undergraduates can grow as researchers and use those skills in the professional world.

Overall, the conference was an incredibly enriching experience and I felt honored to be there representing Wake Forest. Thank you so much to my professors and the department for allowing me to share my research and to meet so many interesting people.

Steve Caracciolo – 57th Annual Naval Academy Foreign Affairs Conference

In April 2017, I was invited to represent Wake Forest at the 57th Annual Naval Academy Foreign Affairs Conference in Annapolis, MD. The theme for the week-long conference was: Are we in an era of new great power competition? Much of the roundtable discussion and many of the speakers focused on this topic and the debate over whether U.S global hegemony is being challenged by states such as China and Russia as well as terrorist organizations from around the world. My roundtable specifically dealt with U.S naval power projection and the ways in which the U.S can use the Navy to maintain power in regions where it might be tested.

The keynote speaker was General John Allen from the U.S Marine Corps. He played a very important role in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan during the War on Terror. His speech centered on the sources that might challenge the U.S in the future. Interestingly, they were not all other countries that challenge us politically or militarily. He mentioned urbanization and the increased use and complexity of technology as institutions that might turn into detriments for the United States and its superpower status. Many of the other speakers were commanders and admirals in the Navy who lent their expertise and advice to the student delegation and Naval Academy cadets.

I was honored to have been chosen to represent Wake Forest at such a prestigious event. I became friends with students from schools all over the country and some from other parts of the world. I even met a commander that attended my high school back home in New Jersey!