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2016-department-photoWe are one of the largest majors on campus, with course offerings that span the globe. Our faculty members are active researchers who, through their teaching, seek to develop students who are critical thinkers and effective writers. Our majors go on to work in government, business, law, policy, and non-profits, both here and abroad.

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Department of Politics and International Affairs
Wake Forest University
Kirby Hall 314A
P.O. Box 7568, Winston-Salem, NC 27109
Phone: (336) 758.5449 | FAX: (336) 758.6104 | Email: wfupol@wfu.edu

 

News

THE PEACE PROCESS IN COLOMBIA: CAN FIFTY-TWO YEARS OF VIOLENCE BE ENDED?

LECTURE BY DR. HARVEY KLINE
WHEN: MARCH 27, 2017
TIME: 5:00 – 7:00 PM
WHERE: KIRBY HALL, ROOM 103

Since going to Colombia in 1964 as an exchange student from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Harvey Kline has returned to Colombia fifteen times and was funded by the Fulbright Hayes Program three of those times. He is working on his tenth book about Colombian politics, five of which have dealt with the attempts of presidents to negotiate an end to the guerrilla conflict.

SPONSOR: LATIN AMERICAN & LATINO STUDIES PROGRAM

U.S. Policy towards Israel / Palestine and Fading Hopes for a Two-State Solution

Dr. Stephen Zunes
University of San Francisco

Tuesday, March 28
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Annenberg Forum (Carswell 111)

For nearly a quarter century, the United States has played the contradictory role of chief mediator in Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and the primary diplomatic, economic, and military supporters of the more powerful of the two parties. During this period, the United States has opposed substantive involvement by the United Nations, insisting that whether and to what extent the occupation should end could come only through the voluntary assent of the occupying power. Now, with the failure of the Trump administration and Congressional leaders to even nominally support a viable two-state solution, what options remain for Israeli-Palestinian peace?

Sponsored by Middle East & South Asia Program