Third Year Students

• Continue to explore careers in the law, and begin to explore what law school is like, so that you can be confident that you are pursuing a good career path.
• Continue to make the best grades possible.
• Continue your involvement in extra-curricular activities. Take leadership roles in these activities if and when the opportunity arises.
• Meet with Wake Forest’s Pre-Law Adviser, Professor Laura Graham, to talk through the process of preparing for applying to law school.
• Begin to research many different law schools to get an idea of which ones have programs that would be of interest to you, which ones are in the geographic area(s) you prefer, which ones have admissions criteria that seem to fit your profile, etc. In particular, watch for announcements about the Graduate and Professional School Fair, usually held on campus in November and sponsored by the OPCD. Representatives from dozens of law schools attend this Fair and are eager to meet prospective students. Click here for more information about how to research schools in print and online.
• Continue to visit the Pre-Law website for updates and announcements.
• Attend any pre-law events and/or workshops advertised on the Pre-Law website and/or the Pre-Law Society listserv. These events are great ways to learn more about the law school admissions process, to find out what law school is really like from a variety of perspectives, and, in some cases, to network with legal professionals.
• Visit some classes at Wake Law, just to get a feel for what law school is like, and if you’re interested, contact Professor Graham to be paired up with a current Wake Law student through an informal mentoring program.
• Begin to prepare for the LSAT. Many students choose to take the LSAT in June after their junior year; some students wait until October. Either way, it is never too early to begin familiarizing yourself with the kinds of questions that are on the LSAT and to explore the various LSAT prep options. One good way to begin is to take a full, timed LSAT, to get a baseline idea of how much and what kind of preparation you need to do.
• Register for the June LSAT, if you know that you will be prepared to take it then. Registration closes six weeks before the test. Most students register online through LSAC.org.
• Start thinking about which faculty members and/or other individuals might be good recommenders.
• If you do not have a paid job lined up for the summer, consider an internship with a legal employer for the summer. This kind of internship will likely be unpaid, but it will give you valuable experience as you prepare to start law school next year. While the OPCD can likely help you with general strategies for finding an internship, it’s likely that you will have to just knock on some doors or make some cold calls to find a legal employer who is willing to have you intern for the summer.