Undergraduate Student Research Presentations: 9/28 in ZSR library Sponsored by The UREAC Center

by on September 28, 2018
Poster # / Oral Pres. Room # Type of Presentation First Name Last Name Major Research Advisor – First Name Research Advisor – Last Name
7 Poster Titilola Babatunde Health & Exercise Science Christy Buchanan
23 Poster Allison Clark Psychology Terry Blumenthal
26 Poster Melissa Cuellar Psychology Lisa Kiang
28 Poster Amanda Davis Psychology Deborah Best
40 Poster Alexandra Groome Psychology Wayne Pratt
42 Poster Suna Guo Psychology E. J. Masicampo
55 Poster Lauren Latham Psychology Janine Jennings
57 Poster Jill Lesley Psychology Eranda Jayawickreme
Room 477 Oral Katherine Quinn Psychology E. J. Masicampo
78 Poster Eli Rice Psychology John Petrocelli
85 Poster Tyler Sar Psychology Lisa Kiang
98 Poster Aparna Sivakumar Psychology Terry Blumenthal
107 Poster Yun Tang Psychology E. J. Masicampo
112 Poster Eliza Wagley Psychology Laura Kammrath

Dean Gillespie announces Professor Buchanan’s plans

by on September 19, 2018

An Announcement From the Dean of the College

x

Professor Buchanan

Dear Wake Forest faculty and staff,

Christy Buchanan will step down as Senior Associate Dean for Academic Advising and return to her position as Professor of Psychology, effective July 1, 2019. Please join me in congratulating Christy on her remarkable six years of supporting our faculty and advocating for our students as Senior Associate Dean and head of the Office of Academic Advising (OAA).

Christy has shown exemplary leadership since being appointed in 2012 to oversee OAA only three years after it opened. During her tenure, she has stressed the importance of advising the “whole student” to ensure our students grow as thoughtful, community-minded individuals while continuing to succeed in the classroom.

Since joining the Department of Psychology in 1992, Christy has championed the need for a strong first-year experience to help incoming students transition to college life at Wake Forest. She has led a two-year piloted collaboration between academic and campus life units across the university to create a first-year elective course entitled FYE 101 that aims to strengthen the academic success, wellbeing, and cultural competence of new students.

Surveys have shown that Wake Forest students who complete FYE 101 demonstrate significantly higher growth in five outcomes: intrinsic motivation for learning, engaged learning, academic determination, diverse citizenship, and an overall “thriving quotient.” Last spring, Christy accepted an Innovative Teaching Award on behalf of the FYE 101 team. She was also asked to join the First-Year Experience Commission that President Nathan O. Hatch formed in 2017.

Christy has been a strong advocate for training students in the theory and practice of deliberation, which enhances civic engagement and results in individuals talking in more productive ways about their differences. Based on her research with Professors Katy Harriger and Jill McMillan, Christy has encouraged the implementation of the deliberative dialogue model across campus, from the critical Campus Climate work of several years ago to the FYE 101 curriculum to the President’s Leadership Council last weekend.

In addition, Christy has worked tirelessly with faculty and staff to provide fun, thought-provoking programming to help freshmen feel welcomed on campus during New Deac Week. More than 500 members of the Class of 2022 registered to participate in Project Wake book discussion groups in August, allowing them to engage in conversations centered around this year’s theme of what it means to live a life of character.

Moreover, Christy has developed with faculty a series of best practices to help students achieve both academic and personal success. Faculty teaching first-year seminars serve as academic advisors to their students, and teams of Faculty Fellows provide guidance and programming in all first-year residences in coordination with the Provost’s Office. Living-Learning Communities have also been created for students housed in the same residences to take first-year seminars and writing courses together.

Christy will continue her research and teach classes on child development and parent-child relationships as part of the Psychology faculty. She will again serve as a lower division advisor, which she has done throughout most of her nearly three decades at Wake Forest. She will also serve as the faculty director for the Southern Cone study abroad program in Santiago, Chile, in Spring 2020.

Our students have benefited enormously from Christy’s vision. She has collaborated with her staff in OAA and our entire faculty to provide incomparable support for all our students. Please join me in thanking Christy for her extraordinary dedication to the Wake Forest community over the past six years. She has made a lasting impact on this institution by pressing us all to embrace new, more effective ways to support and educate the whole student.

A search will begin soon to find a new Associate Dean for Academic Advising to oversee OAA. We will release more information about the search in the near future.

Sincerely,

Michele Gillespie

Professor Dale Dagenbach receives NIH grant to study complex brain networks

by on August 21, 2018

 

Congratulations to Professor Dagenbach for his recent NIH research grant:   “Analytical Tools for Complex Brain Networks: Fusing Novel Statistical Methods and Network Science to Understand Brain Function. “ (PI subcontract, Co-I grant).”

The research involves developing multivariate analyses that take full advantage of the rich data available in network science studies of brain functioning.  The application that Dr. Dagenbach is involved with entails using these approaches to analyze Human Connectome Project data relating cognitive functioning to brain states.

 

Professor  Dagenbach developed this research application last year while on research leave. This leave followed his long service as the department chair.

For more of  Professor Dagenbach’s work,  See:  dagenbach-vita

Professor Petrocelli’s research on Bullshitting discussed in Psychology Today

by on July 12, 2018

Dr. John Petrocelli

Professor’s Petrocelli’s research on the personality and situational antecedents of “bullshitting” was recently discussed in a psychologytoday.com article . His scientific work on this topic was published recently published:  Petrocelli, J. V. (2018). Antecedents of bullshitting. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 76, 249-258,

 

What a bunch of bull: The art and science of BS
Psychology Today
June 30, 2018
Recent research at Wake Forest University looked into the antecedents of BS. Psychology Professor John Petrocelli and team ran a series of experiments that examined the idea of a person having i) too little, ii) adequate, or iii) too much topic knowledge, and the extent to which they bullshitted.

 

Here are some highlights excerpted from the JESP empirical article:

Highlights

Bullshitting involves communicating with little concern for evidence or truth.

Bullshitting behavior appears to have specific antecedents.

People bullshit when obligated to communicate about things they know little about.

People bullshit when expecting to receive a social pass of acceptability for it.

Bullshitting is attenuated when social cues signal difficulty in obtaining a pass.

 

Special Beacon Project Colloquium: “How do Moral Beacons Foster Community?”

by on April 28, 2018

The colloquium speakers and discussion panel.

 

Do moral beacons enable people to work across differences that exist across different communities (as moral beacons such as Martin Luther King Jr. did), or does the current climate mean that our silo-ed communities are doomed to have their own moral beacons? Can “moral beacons” foster positive societal change? Does a lack of moral beacons in contemporary society indicate deeper problems in our community? (From Beacon homepage, see:  http://www.moralbeacons.org/wfu-reading-groups/community/

These questions and more are some of the issues discussed at the Beacon Project special colloquium, April 17th & 18th   A notable panel of speakers included: Larissa MacFarquhar, staff writer at the New Yorker; Deo Niyizonkiza, Rwandan genocide survivor and protagonist of Tracy Kidder’s book “Strength in What Remains”; and Larry Walker, Professor of Psychology at University of British Columbia, Moral Psychology Research Knowledge Expert.

 

 Each speaker provided unique insights into the issues surrounding how the morally exceptional may play a positive role in fostering character and community development.

 

The event was sponsored by the Templeton Religion Trust Foundation, Rethinking Community and the Provost Office of WFU.

A Stellar Spring for Professor R. Michael Furr

by on April 27, 2018

 

Professor  Furr was on research leave this spring, but he has been VERY busy, indeed!

 

 

The semester began with the release of the 3rd edition of his book:  PSYCHOMETRICS. In this text, he takes a “meaning approach” to concepts,  rather than a  “how to” handbook. He describes his goal as introducing psychometric principles at a deeper and more focused level

than in many texts, and his approach more intuitive than traditionally found in technical publications.

 

Following on the heels of the release of his book, Anna Hartley (former postdoc with the Beacon Project, now a Senior Research Manager with Amazon) and Professor Furr received the Society of Personality Assessment’s Walter F Klopfer award for distinguished contributions to the literature in personality assessment.
The paper was recognized for the best empirical paper published in the Journal of Personality Assessment in 2017. The award was presented  at the recent (March 2018) conference of the Society for Personality Assessment.

 

 

Not long thereafter, Dr.  Furr was selected as the very first recipient of the newly established Annual Psychology Alumni Award at UC Riverside.
 
Dr. Furr received his doctorate from University of California, Riverside in 2000. He will travel back there to address their department and be

Professor  Furr was on research leave this spring, but he has been VERY busy, indeed!

 

 

The semester began with the release of the 3rd edition of his book:  PSYCHOMETRICS. In this text, he takes a “meaning approach” to concepts,  rather than a  “how to” handbook. He describes his goal as introducing psychometric principles at a deeper and more focused level than in many texts, and his approach more intuitive than traditionally found in technical publications.

 

Following on the heels of the release of his book, Anna Hartley (former postdoc with the Beacon Project, now a Senior Research Manager with Amazon) and Professor Furr received the Society of Personality Assessment’s Walter F Klopfer award for distinguished contributions to the literature in personality assessment.
The paper was recognized for the best empirical paper published in the Journal of Personality Assessment in 2017. The award was presented  at the recent (March 2018) conference of the Society for Personality Assessment.

 

 

Not long thereafter, Dr.  Furr was selected as the very first recipient of the newly established Annual Psychology Alumni Award at UC Riverside.
 
Dr. Furr received his doctorate from University of California, Riverside in 2000. He will travel back there to address their department and receive this award in September.

 

Dr. Furr was also a part of the Beacon Project’s Special Colloquium series on the community impact of Moral Beacons (See upcoming article on this site and http://www.moralbeacons.org/wfu-reading-groups/community/ )

 

Congratulations Dr. Furr!

 

 

honored withthis award in September.

 

Dr. Furr was also a part of the Beacon Project’s Special Colloquium series on the community impact of Moral Beacons (See upcoming article on this site and http://www.moralbeacons.org/wfu-reading-groups/community/ )

 

Congratulations Dr. Furr!

 

 

 

 

 

The Beacon Project announces a special colloquium series: April 17th and 18th

by on April 6, 2018

The Beacon Project announces an upcoming colloquium at Hanesbrand Theater in Winston-Salem, NC on Tuesday April 17th and Wednesday 18th, 2018. Registration is required (see link below). If you would like a copy of either of the author’s books, please stop by the Beacon Project Lab Room 419.

 

Speakers are:

Larissa MacFarquhar, staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. Her subjects have included John Ashbery, Barack Obama, and Noam Chomsky, among many others. She is the author of “Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to Help.”

Deogratias Niyizonkiza, protagonist of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder’s bestselling book Strength in What Remains, Deogratias (“Deo”). Deo was a medical student in Burundi during the ethnic civil war between the Hutus and the Tutsis.

Larry Walker, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia. Dr. Walker’s program of research focuses on the psychology of moral development, particularly in terms of moral reasoning, personality, motivation, and identity.

Topic:

Do moral beacons enable people to work across differences that exist across different communities (as moral beacons such as Martin Luther King Jr. did), or does the current climate mean that our silo-ed communities are doomed to have their own moral beacons? Can “moral beacons” foster positive societal change? Does a lack of moral beacons in contemporary society indicate deeper problems in our community? We believe that the time is ripe for a discussion of the role “moral beacons” have in fostering community and dialogue across different communities, as well as their place in contemporary society.

Schedule:

Tuesday April 17

5:30 – 6pm Refreshments provided by Providence Restaurant and Catering

6pm – 6:10 Opening Remarks

6:10 – 6:50 Larry Walker, Professor of Psychology at University of British Columbia, Moral Psychology Research Knowledge Expert

7:00 – 7:40 Deo Niyizonkiza, protagonist of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder’s bestselling book Strength in What Remains

7:40 – 8:00 Reception, books for sale by Bookmarks

Registration for Tuesday April 17

 

 

Wednesday April 18

5:30 – 6pm Refreshments provided by Providence Restaurant and Catering

6:00 – 6:05 Opening Remarks

6:05 – 7:00 Larissa MacFarquhar, the author of “Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to Help”

7:15 – 8:00 Panel Discussion with all speakers

8:00 – 8:30 Book Signing, books for sale by Bookmarks

Registration for Wednesday April 18

Event is sponsored by Wake Forest University, the Templeton Religion Trust, and the ReThinking Community Initiative.

Contact Kathleen Stimely, Beacon Project Program Manager at beacon@wfu.edu for more information.

We are saddened by the loss of our esteemed colleague and friend, Professor James Schirillo

by on April 4, 2018

Professor James Schirillo

 

We are saddened to announce that James A. Schirillo, former professor of psychology, died March 31.

The memorial will be at St.Annes Episcopal Church on Friday April 20 @1:00pm.

Donations can be made to St Anne’s Episcopal Church or K B Reynolds Hospice Home.”

Professor Schirillo joined Wake Forest’s psychology faculty in 1996.

We grieve Professor Schirillo’s death and extend our condolences to his family and friends, as well as those at Wake Forest who had the opportunity to know him.

Wake Forest offers support and counseling services for all students, faculty and staff.  The Counseling Center may be reached at 336-758-5273, the Chaplain’s Office at 336-758-5210.  For faculty and staff, there is also the Employee Assistance Program at 336-716-5493.

 

Dr. James Schirillo started his career as a psychologist at Franklin and Marshall College, majoring in 1979 in clinical-behavioral psychology. He worked as a counselor after graduation until 1985, but then, deciding that scientific work would be more to his taste, came to study for his PhD with Adam Reeves at Northeastern University, essaying an older interest in visual perception sparked by Eugene Wist at Franklin and Marshall. His 1990 PhD thesis work on pi-mechanisms of color vision revealed inter alia that middle-wave cone isolated stimuli, when briefly flashed just above threshold, evoke not green sensations, but blue ones (Schirillo & Reeves, CRA, 2001). He also began studies of color constancy and achromatic perception with Larry Arend, finding especially that lightness and brightness differ fundamentally in how they depend on perceived depth (Schirillo et al., P&P, 1991). In 1991 Jim transferred to the lab of Steven Shevell at the University of Chicago, where as a post-doc he studied chromatic induction and the role of articulation on the perception of brightness and illumination (keynote: ECVP, Trieste, 1998; Schirillo & Shevell, Perception, 2002). Jim joined the Department of Psychology at Wake Forest University in 1996.  He regularly taught courses in Perception and Physiological Psychology, as well as specialty seminars that intersected with his interests in the arts and the philosophy of mind, such as the Psychology of Art and Psychological Utopias.  He was driven by a strong desire to understand aesthetics and emotional responses to art and architecture; for instance, he applied his knowledge of perception and brain lateralization to help understand human emotional responses to the portraits of Rembrandt and the paintings of Mondriaan.  Jim also mentored undergraduate and Master’s-level students in research that examined interactions between visual and auditory perception (Schirillo, AP&P, 2011).  Altogether, Dr. Schirillo published more than 40 peer-reviewed manuscripts.  Many of those publications arose from research accomplished with his students, several of whom developed scientific careers of their own. He delighted in his work with his students, and they fondly remember his warm, patient and demanding mentorship style.  His work earned him the rank of Full Professor at Wake Forest University in 2009.  Jim died on March 30th, 2018, of kidney failure. He will be deeply missed, by his family, his church, his students, and his colleagues.

Professor J.V. Petrocelli’s recent research highlighted in public and professional press

by on March 26, 2018

.

As noted by the Wall Street Journal (March 19th:  See BS meter copied above)

In the digital age, misinformation—from nonsense to lies—spreads faster than ever and is becoming an area of serious research

Understanding the causes and consequences of B.S. is a recent theme in recent research conducted by  John V. Petrocelli, Ph.D., Scott Family Faculty Associate Professor of Psychology., and this work is recently highlighted in both academic and popular press.

You can read his scientific research on this topic: The Antecedents of Bullshitting, (in press) in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology ….   AND recently discussed in….March 19th, The Wall Street Journal: “Fine tune your BS detector: You’ll need it”  

https://www.wsj.com/articles/fine-tune-your-b-s-detector-youll-need-it-1521471721.

 

Professor Petrocelli recently chaired a SPSP symposium: “Bullshitting:Empirical and Experiential Examinations on Pervasive Social Behavior” (2018 meeting of the Society of Social & Personality Psychology, Atlanta, GA).   In this symposium, Dr. Petrocelli explained that:

 

Bullshitting involves communicating with little to no regard for evidence

or truth. Very little is known, empirically, about this seemingly pervasive

social behavior. This symposium demonstrates the value of understanding

bullshitting by examining its antecedents and consequences, when people

are receptive and sensitive to it, and conditions under which people identify

it for what it is.   JVP,


 

Angelica Puzio (WFU MA, 2017) receives the Judith L. Gibbons Award

by on March 15, 2018

  Angelica Puzio (WFU MA, 2017) was recently awarded the Judith L. Gibbons Award for Research on Culture and GenderThe award was presented  at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for  Cross-Cultural Research, February 21-21, 2018, in a symposium titled: Gender Socialization in Context: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the Empowerment of Women and Girls.

The award  was based on research conducted for her WFU Master’s thesis, The Socialization of the Adolescent Voice: Self-Silencing as an Expression of Culture and Context –thesis advisor:  Deborah L. Best.   Ms. Puzio is presently a PhD student at NYU.

Judith L. Gibbons Award for Research on Culture and Gender

This award is in honor of long time SCCR member Dr. Judith L. Gibbons, Professor Emerita of Psychology at Saint Louis University. The award is given yearly to a graduate student or early career professional (within 7 years of receiving their PhD) who presents research on culture and gender at the annual SCCR meeting.