SETTING
Dayton, Tennessee
July 1925

The University Theatre presents

Monkey Business

by Murray Ross
with Whit Andrews & Ken Pellow


Director
Sharon Andrews

Set Designer
Mary Wayne-Thomas

Lighting Designer
Jonathan Christman

Costume Designer
Lisa Weller

Choral Director
Brian Gorelick

Sound Designer
Rebecca Lowry*

Assistant Director
Jonathan Watkins*

Stage Manager
Susan Martin *


February 13-14, 18-22, 2004


 

 
CAST

H.L. MENCKEN
Joey Picard*

AMANDA
Natalie Bonomo*

HOWARD MORGAN
Jason Romaine

JOHN SCOPES
Nathaniel Stewart

RICKY ROBINSON
Matt Zakreski

CLYDE PITTS
Michael Casby

ZEKE BUNTING
Mike Kelly*

REBECCA DOWNES
Laura Halsey

LAUREL
Cainna Jirikowic*

AMELIA CUTHBERT
Nicole McNamara*

FLORENCE HASKELL
Mary Patterson Broome*

SHERIFF CLEARWATER
Erich Jones*

WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN
Matt Schumacher

MARY BRYAN
Meredith Ducz*

LUCY
Bethany Novak*

REVEREND SMUCKER
Nick Ewen*

QUALLIE MOON
Joe Martinez

GROUCHO MARX
Matt Wilson

CHICO MARX
Madeline Smith*

HARPO MARX
George Graves*

CLARENCE DARROW
Scotty Candler*

REVIVAL MINISTER
Zach Tysinger*

JUDGE RAULSTON
James McKell

SUSANNA
Alyssa Biber*

BETTY LYNN
Anna Edgerton

T.T. MARTIN
Adam Humenansky*

SALLY
Dowd Keith

ABBY
Katharine McEnery

VIOLET
Lauren Rico*

MUSICIAN
Darren Lael, piano

MISSING LINKS
Tom Clark*
Melissa Gervasio*


REVIVAL CONGREGATION
Alyssa Biber*, Natalie Bonomo*, Mary Patterson Broome*, Mike Casby, Anna Edgerton, Nick Ewen*, Adam Humenansky*, Erich Jones*, Dowd Keith, Mike Kelly*, Joe Martinez, Katharine McEnery, James McKell, Nicole McNamara*, Bethany Novak*, Lauren Rico*, Jason Romaine, Matt Zakreski


* Member of The Anthony Aston Players

 
















PRODUCTION STAFF

Technical Director
Trevor Anderson

Costume Shop Supervisor
Lisa Weller

Costume Conservator
Alice Barsony

Audience Services Coordinator
Leslie Collins

Assistant Stage Managers
Kate Bashore, Lindsey Hardegree

Master Electrician
Madeline Smith*

Master Carpenter
J.D. Stallings

Prop Master
Katy Slavin*

Scene Shop Assistants
Rachel Field, Melissa Gervasio*,
Melissa Jones*, Erika Libero, Laura Lutkefedder,Matthew Meaney, Pip Rinehart*, Adrian Singerman

Electrics Crew
Jonathan Adams, Derek Aherne,
Matthew Fox, Paul Lund, Benjamin William

Wardrobe/Hair & Makeup
Meagan Hooper

Costume Assistants
Katie Delsandro, Hannah Guthrie,
Andrea Leutz, Matthew Tomko

Costume Construction Crew
Mary Taylor Carroll, Kelly Fletcher, Sarah Giblin, Ashley Holets,
Meredith Manning, Emily Nemith, Jenny Peden, Samanth Simmons, Mary Beth Woody

Scenic Art Crew
Katie Evans, Laura Fawley,Kyle Ferris, Chad Graham, Andrew Knox, Jennifer Pinkard, Brian Shust, Sarah Yocum

Grips
J.D. Stallings

Follow Spot Operator
J.D. Stallings

Office Assistant
Cambra Overend*

Poster Design
Jonathan Christman

Photography
Bill Ray III, Leslie Collins,
Jonathan Christman

Box Office/Front of House Staff
Alexandra Beiter, Caroline Clear*,
Alison Delaney*, Alannah DiBona, Cara Lee, Everett Long*, Jacob Morris, Lauren Rico*

Publicity
John Chisholm, Amy Dalton,
Ryan Feeley, Juliet Georgetti, Alicia Jurney,Kristen Kemp, Sarah Kozey, Stephen Liadis,Delon Lowe, Ben Mauk, Erin Miller,Kenneth Moore, John Murdock, John Pyle,
Casey Schoenlank,Amber Schonbrun,Morgan Stone, C.J. Williams

* member of the Anthony Aston Players


SPECIAL THANKS
The Little Theatre of Winston-Salem
Leah Roy
Tom Davis, Brian College
Whit Andrews
West End Antiques
Jolie Tingen

DIRECTOR’S NOTES

"We are now prepared as was no previous age for a Carnival in
the grand style, for laughter and a high-spirited revelry, for
transcendental flights of sublime nonsense and an Aristophaneslike
mockery of the universe. Perhaps this is where we shall yet
discover the realm of our invention that realm in which we also
can be original, say as parodists of world history and clowns of
God--perhaps, even if nothing else today has a future, our
laughter may yet have a future."
--Frederich Nietzsche

Murray Ross placed this quote on the first page of the first incarnation of his play Monkey Business. It has been used as an inspirational quide by the director, designers and actors of the current production of this playful, provocative and unconventional play.
The Scopes Trial was in reality a carnival, a media circus and a fervent two week religious revival. So it is a short leap from this event to the creation of a theatrical event that in the spirit of Nietzsche puts the Marx brothers at the Scopes Trial and offers "transcendental flights of sublime nonsense."

In July of 1925 the small town of Dayton, Tennessee was overflowing
with lawyers, politicians, vendors, street preachers, performers, and photographers and reporters from all over the world. The latter included the infamous Baltimore Sun reporter
H.L Mencken who christened the whole thing the Great Monkey Trial. The entire world watched as the past battled the future. Simple faith and long held values were challenged by the wicked ways of the jazz age. The trial was more than just the obvious
conflict of evolution vs. religion. Fundamentalism was challenged
by modernism. Two powerful lawyers came to Dayton to do battle. The Great Commoner, William Jennings Bryan was there to defend the Christians in a "duel to the death." Clarence Darrow, at the time America's most famous defense lawyer, weighed in on the side of science and man as the "learning
animal." The whole world watched and laughed.

Monkey Business is almost a new play. It was created and performed
once by a company (Theaterworks) in Colorado Springs 18 years ago. The members of the theatre department here at Wake have long felt that it is a good thing to periodically give the students an opportunity to engage in the process of new play development. I chose to direct Monkey Business because I knew the primary playwright would come play with us and that another contributing playwright lived close by so we would be able to continue the process of developing this play and the students would be given the opportunity to get their own hands in at shaping a piece of theatre. It is disconcerting to a student actor to hear from the director, "I don't know what you
would do there. Figure something out and we'll look at it" but all
32 students on stage tonight have taken that challenge with aplomb and contributed great heart and imagination to this production.
I love the spirit of this play. While it delivers no easy answers to the big questions posed during the "Trial of the Century," it does suggest we human beings have to be rather careful about taking ourselves too seriously.






Return to Main Page
Webpage by Jonathan Christman- 11/02/2004 Access count: