The University Theatre presents

Into the Woods

Music and Lyrics by
Stephen Sondheim

Book by James Lapine


Director
Cindy Gendrich

Music Director
David Hagy

Vocal Director
Lorraine DiSimone

Movement
Leah Elyce Roy

Asst. Movement Director
Meagan Hooper*

Set Designer
Frank Ludwig

Costume Designer
Erin Korey

Lighting Designer
Jonathan Christman

Sound Designer
Nick Ewen*

Stage Manager
Cambra Overend*


April 2-4, 7-10, 2004


 
 CAST

NARRATOR
Scott Thompson*

CINDERELLA
Lauren Russell

BAKER’S WIFE
Kate Roberts*

BAKER
Bill Ballard

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD Laura Greer Halsey

WITCH
Alexandra Hull

JACK
Erich Jones*

CINDERELLA’S PRINCE/WOLF
Mitchell Dean

RAPUNZEL’S PRINCE
Zach Tysinger*

MYSTERIOUS MAN
James Wise

JACK’S MOTHER
Christal Boyd

STEWARD
J.D. Stallings

RAPUNZEL
Katharine McEnery*

CINDERELLA’S FATHER
Taylor Robertson


CINDERELLA’S STEPMOTHER
Meredith Ducz*

FLORINDA
Morgan Brubaker

LUCINDA
Katy Slavin*

CINDERELLA’S MOTHER
Elissa Gorey

LITTLE RED’S GRANDMOTHER
Katie Rouse

GIANT’S VOICE
Shanna Depow

MILKY WHITE/SLEEPING BEAUTY
Meagan Hooper*

MILKY WHITE/SNOW WHITE Kate Bashor

ORCHESTRA

VIOLIN
Karissa Flynn, Concertmaster;
Jonathan Newman

VIOLA
Caroline Beasley,
Louise Lammons


CELLO
Rebekah Cansler

BASS
Stephen Tarsa

FLUTE
Katharine Livingston

CLARINET
Amanda Sollars

BASSOON
Sasha Gee Enegren

HORN
Clark Matthews,
Ben Weber


TRUMPET
Rory Davis

PERCUSSION
Tom Rutledge

KEYBOARDS
Danny Moebs
Derek Shore


* Member of The Anthony Aston Players

 

















PRODUCTION STAFF

Technical Director
Trevor Anderson

Costume Studio Supervisor
Lisa Weller

Audience Services Coordinator
Leslie Collins

Assistant Stage Managers
Alexandra Beiter, Laura Lutkefedder

Assistant Technical Director
J.D. Stallings

Master Electrician
Madeline Smith*

Master Carpenter
Matthew Meany

Prop Master
Katy Slavin*

Sculpting Assistants
Rachel Field, Melissa Jones*

Rehearsal Accompanists
David Hagy, Danny Moebs, Matt Webb

Scene Shop Assistants
Matt Gutschick*, Melissa Gervasio*,
Erika Libero, Laura Lutkefedder,
Pip Rinehart*, Adrian Singerman, Zach Tysinger*

Scene Crew
Jill Braddy, Kenny Case, Philip Deibel,Elise Francis, Drew Hickerson, Cady Loftus,Ryan Mason, Joel Maynard, Matthew Melton,John Moseley, Chris Penta, Stuart Whatley, Bradley Yates

Costume Conservator
Alice Barsony

Wardrobe/Hair & Makeup
Melissa Joyner, Shanna Depow

Costume Assistants
Rachel Baxley, Laura Bullins,
Katie Delsandro, Hannah Guthrie, Sarah Guthrie, Andrea Leutz, Matthew Tomko

Costume Construction Crew
Mary Taylor Carroll, Kelly Fletcher,
Sarah Giblin, Ashley Holetz, Meredith Manning,
Emily Nemith, Jennifer Peden, Samantha Simmons, Jessica Triplett, Mary Beth Woody

Electrics Crew
Josh Ellis, Carlisle Hamrick, Jason Koch, Greg Mazares, David Stickney, Harold Thompson

Scenic Art Crew
Jack Bradley, Traci Cherry, Tripp Cockerham,
Blake Holleman, Chris Hood, Rachel Morgan,
Lindsey Perea, Lauren Peterson, Amit Ravani,
Andrew Robida, Jessica Ryan, Kristin Smith

Grips
Pete Demoise, Jordan Munn

Flies
Adam Humenansky*

Light Board Operator
Scotty Candler*

Sound Board Operator
Chris Hayes

Spotlight Operator
Evan McMillan, Kristin Stewart

Microphone Mixer
Rebecca Lowry*

Administrative Assistant
Carol Lavis

Office Assistant
Cambra Overend*

Poster Design
Frank Ludwig

Photography
Bill Ray III, Leslie Collins

Box Office/Front of House Staff Alexandra Beiter, Caroline Clear*,
Alison Delaney*, Alannah DiBona, Cara Lee, Everett Long*, Jacob Morris, Lauren Rico*

Publicity
John Chisholm, Amy Dalton, Ryan Feeley, Juliet Georgetti, Alicia Jurney, Kristen Kemp,Sarah Kozey, Stephen Liadis, Delon Lowe,
Ben Mauk, Erin Miller, Kenneth Moore,John Murdock, John Pyle, Casey Schoenlank,Amber Schonbrun, Morgan Stone, C.J. Williams

* Member of The Anthony Aston Players


SPECIAL THANKS
Catawba College
North Carolina School of the Arts
Woody Hood

DIRECTOR’S NOTE

This past September, Dean Paul Escott announced he would be leaving his position as Dean of the College at the end of the year. We in the Department of Theatre and Dance immediately decided to dedicate this, the last theatre production of his
last year in the Dean’s office, to him. Over his entire tenure as Dean, Paul Escott has been our tireless supporter, and we will miss him.

It may be stretching an analogy, but I dare say Paul’s work as the college’s fearless leader has been rather like being one of the characters in Into the Woods. Killing giants and granting wishes might not have been parts of his original job description, but I feel sure he’s been asked to do both, metaphorically or not. Now it’s time for him to leave those particular woods and enjoy his research and teaching without such unusual pressures—from us or anyone else. With Into the Woods, we wish him
well and thank him for his generosity, his good will, and his friendship.

For us working on this beautiful play, Into the Woods has been both a gift and a challenge. The cast and directing staff have repeatedly claimed that Sondheim is “an evil genius.” His music, words, and ideas fuse together in ways that put to rest any charge that music theatre need be a frivolous genre. Despite its basis in stories we all already know—or think we know—this fairy tale musical is hard stuff. However, it’s also deeply rewarding. Into the
Woods has challenged our technical acumen, our artistry, and our
stamina, but it’s been a journey full of the pleasures of the play— its fun, its emotional strength, its pure exhilaration, and its insights.

It has also taught us things that can make us better citizens of the world. We’re constantly told that we live in dangerous times—days filled with terrors and terrorists, a time, in short, when we should all feel afraid. But the world has always been
dangerous, and our fear does little to protect us. Instead, I’d like to suggest that this play (along with recent current events) teaches
us to reach beyond fear, past the reptilian self that focuses on
grabbing, bullying, self-protection, and greed. We must develop instead the limbic, mammalian part of our brains, which allows us to empathize and bond.

Sondheim also shares some sentiments expressed by one of my favorite poets, Ranier Maria Rilke, who urged courage in the face of everyday fear, and asked us to “sound the depths of [our] own being.” He wrote, “For if we imagine this being of the individual as a larger or smaller room, it is obvious that most people come to know only one corner of their room, one spot
near the window, one narrow strip on which they keep walking back and forth.” While such limits do provide “a certain security,” Rilke said, they also act as a trap that restricts self-knowledge and leads to boring, meaningless, colorless lives. In other words, to sound the depths of our being we must go into the woods, confront our fears, make mistakes, learn to trust, and know we will come
away wiser. The woods may be scary, but they’re also where all the action is.
So come into the woods with us. Let’s plant some magic beans, kiss some princes, and celebrate our humanity. Paul, from all of us in Theatre and Dance, this is for you.










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