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Spring 2014 Course Schedule

Posted By admin On October 11, 2011 @ 10:42 am In | No Comments

 WGS 101 Window on Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies   (1 hr)            

Wanda Balzano/ David Phillips
Tuesday (1/21/2014 and 4/29/2014)  5:00-5:50 pm                   
Tribble / DeTamble A110

An opportunity to experience and reflect analytically on the diverse cultural and intellectual life of Wake Forest, with an emphasis on WGS events and topics. Students attend events and write about them. See course page [1].
(Class meets twice.)  P/F only.

WGS 221/WGS 620AG Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
(3 hr)  
Sally Barbour/Bernadine Barnes 
Wednesday 2:00-4:30 pm
Tribble A4

An interdisciplinary course that integrates materials from the humanities and the sciences, taught by WGS faculty representing at least two fields.  Topics include critical methods and practical solutions, history and theory of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, women in culture and society, and cross-cultural issues of gender, ethnicity, social class, disability, and sexual orientation.  (CD)

WGS 319  Women Playwrights (3 hr)                                                         
J. K. Curry
Monday/Wednesday   12:30-1:45 p.m.                                                        
SFAC 214

An examination of selected plays and/or performance texts by women. Focus varies, for example, looking at works by contemporary American women or early women dramatists such as Hrosvitha, Sor Juana, and Aphra Behn. Same as THE 373.  (CD)

WGS 320B   Feminist Theory and Practice (3 hr)      
Michaelle Browers
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45                                 
Kirby B01B

This course will introduce students to debates and developments in contemporary feminist theorizing and their implications for the study and practice of politics.  Throughout the course we will pay close attention to the ways in which gender intersects with class, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and other forms of difference.  Same as POL 277.  Approved for WGS Major Theory Requirement.

WGS 321 A/ WGS 621 AG Men, Women, and Pornography  (3 hr)
Shannon Gilreath
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15                                                     
Tribble A305

This class will engage cultural analyses of pornography and will examine pornography’s role in the lives of men and women.

WGS 321B Women, Race, and Poverty  (3 hr)
Sherri Clark
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15 pm                                     
Room TBA

This course applies theoretical perspectives of the causes and consequences of social inequality for women of color to a broad array of texts and articles in the social sciences. We will examine important issues of motherhood and marriage; race and identity; class and education; and housing segregation and predatory lending practices. We will address what needs to change in order to dismantle poverty and inequality in the U.S. for future generations of all women. Same as AES 310 and EDU 310. Approved for ANT credit.        

WGS 321C/WGS 621CG Democracy and Difference  (3 hr)
Michaelle Browers
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 am-12:14 pm                                     
Kirby B01B

This course examines the theoretical underpinnings of democracy and some of the critiques of those foundations.  With a focus on gender and other forms of difference, this course helps to understand some of the major theories of democracy and how key democratic concepts are defined differently within these various traditions. Same as POL 272 Democratic Theory.  Approved as a Service Learning Course.

WGS 321D/WGS 621DG Politics of Bodies, Sexuality, and Childbirth  (3 hr)
Teresa Smith
Monday 3:15-5:45 pm                                  
Tribble A305

A course that addresses a variety of issues such as body image, gender identity, sexual orientation, pleasure and sexual violence. This course will also explore the scope of the reproductive system in relation to these issues, such as the menstrual cycle, fertility and contraception, pregnancy, childbirth, abortion, reproductive technology, adoption, and menopause. A goal of this course is to create awareness of alternative views and information about this subject matter.   This course offers HPA credit.      

WGS 329 Feminist Anthropology: Politics of Gender and Sexualities Across Cultures (3 hr)                  
Sandya Hewamanne
Monday/Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 pm                                                                   Tribble A4

This course will examine cultural constructions of gender from a cross-cultural perspective, by examining through texts, films and other material from popular culture the ways in which individuals and societies produce, negotiate, perform and contest dominant gender ideologies and identities.  We will look at how women at the intersections of gender, race, sexuality and other power hierarchies negotiate social control, globalization, empowerment, socio-cultural change and collective political action in diverse ways. Same as POL 286.  Same as ANT 329.

WGS 358A WGS 658AG Mothers and Daughters – Literature and Theory
(3 hr)                                                                    
Mary DeShazer
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45 p.m. 
Tribble A202

In this course we will examine the complexities of motherhood and mother-daughter relationships for contemporary women across cultures. After an introductory week, the class will be divided into two sections: (1) Multicultural U.S. representations of mothers and daughters in fiction, poetry, and theory, and (2) Maternal desire and the politicization of motherhood.  Same as ENG 340/640G.

WGS 377C/WGS 677CG Special Topic: Reading Illness Narratives – Clinical and Literary Perspectives (3 hr)   
Mary DeShazer/Richard McQuellon
Wednesday   6:30 – 8:30 pm
Tribble A202

How have modern writers represented the “kingdom of the sick”? This course will examine literature and films that probe the experience of living with (and sometimes dying of) a serious illness. From our perspectives as a literary scholar and a psychosocial oncologist, the professors will invite students to consider what people with life-threatening illness reveal in memoirs, how fictional, poetic, and theatrical representations of illness operate, and what literary and visual techniques artists use in creating narratives about illness. Students will also examine what these writers and filmmakers teach us about living close to death, how race and gender affect the themes and strategies of illness narratives, and how assigned texts depict the art of empathy and caregiving. Same as ENG 302.

WGS 377D Embodying the Feminine Divine  (3 hr)                                                         Angela Yarber
Monday/Wednesday 2:00-3:15p.m.                                                                     
Tribble A305

The feminine divine is embodied in the movements of women throughout the ages.  Whether it is the goddess dancing in creation myths, the role of dancing women in scripture, women’s embodied practices in religious rituals, or women embodying the sacred in modern dance, the divine feminine plays a vital role in dance since the dawn of time.  This course develops competency in women’s studies by fusing feminist theory with performance studies through study of the three “mothers” of modern dance, Isadora Duncan, Ruth St. Denis, and Martha Graham.  It will also develop competency in biblical studies by focusing on exegetical interpretations of scriptural women in dance and also examine the role of the feminine divine in more contemporary work, including that of Judith Jamison, Kazuo Ohno, Rukmini Devi, Sarah Levi-Tanai, and Shakina Reinhertz. This course offers credit toward Divinity.

WGS 377E Special Topic: Human Rights – Theory and Practice  (3 hr)
Patricia Willis
Thursday   2:00-4:30 pm                                                                                               
Tribble A305

We will focus on various human rights documents, as defined and promoted by the United Nations, and will examine what can be done on local levels through service learning. In recent years human rights issues have come to the forefront of world and local agendas as activists, lawyers, and others have sought to promote justice on all levels of human life: indigenous rights, economic rights, women’s rights, gender and sexuality identification rights, the rights of the disabled, etc. Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement Requirement. Approved for INS Global Thematic Studies (cultural studies).

 WGS 377F/WGS 677FG Transgender History, Identity and Politics
(3 hr)                              
Angela Mazaris
Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45 p.m.                                                                                  Tribble A104

This course explores the experiences of, and responses to transgender, gender non-conforming, and intersex (TGI) people in 19th and 20th century America. We will examine how scientific/medical authorities, legal authorities, and everyday people have understood and responded to various kinds of gender non-conformity. Course texts include social histories, medical and legal perspectives, popular culture, and the work of contemporary TGI activists.  Same as HST 311A. Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement Requirement.

WGS 377G Special Topic: Women, Men, and the Law (3 hr)                                  
Maureen Eggert
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00-12:15 pm                                                         
Tribble A305               

An introduction to the judicial system, focusing on feminism and feminist legal theory.  We will first address the legal history and development of American women’s legal rights and then move to particular legal issues of importance to women today.  Topics will include constitutional equality, family law, reproductive rights, employment, and violence against women   

WGS 396A  Independent Study (1-3 hr)                                    
Staff TBA

Independent projects in women’s and gender studies which either continue study begun in regular courses or develop new areas of interest.  Permission of Department.  POI.           

WGS 397A Internships in WGS (1.5-3.0 hr)                                      
Sherri Lawson Clark
Thursday 1:00-1:50 pm (1/14/14,3/18/13,4/22/13)                      
Tribble A4     

Opportunities to engage with local social service providers in applying theoretical and empirical concepts learned in WGS classes to real world experiences in professional, supervised internships, performing direct services, conducting programmatic research, and/or receiving training in program administration.   

WGS 397B Internships: PREPARE (1.5)          
Denisha Champion/Rob McNamara
Tuesday   3:30-4:45 pm                                        
Greene Hall 321

This course provides students with an overview of the social, emotional and legal issues related to sexual violence, and teaches them to design and implement educational programs on this topic.  P/F only.  Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement Requirement.

WGS 100C-J   RAD: Rape Aggression Defense for Women (1 hr)                                      Nicole Pastor-Rodriguez/Jeff Holleman

8 Sections: Sections C-H 3:50-5:20pm ; Sections I-J 2:00-2:55pm                                          Luter Lounge 
C  8/27-10/08, Tuesday        D  10/22-12/03, Tuesday       E  08/28-10/09, Wednesday        

F  10/23-12/04, Wednesday     G  08/29-10/10, Thursday     H  10/24-12/05, Thursday       

I  08/28-10/14, Mon/Wed          J  10/21-12/04, Mon/Wed    

A class that develops and enhances the options of self-defense for women in case of attack.  Includes basic physical self-defense tactics, risk reduction, and avoidance.  Requires violence against women readings.  P/F only.       

                 

Other Course Offerings for WGS Credit                                                     Spring 2014

AES 251   Race and Ethnic Diversity in America (3 hr)                        
Sherri Lawson Clark
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15pm                              
Room TBA

This course applies theoretical perspectives of the causes and consequences of social inequality for women of color to a broad array of texts and articles in the social sciences. We will examine important issues of motherhood and marriage; race and identity; class and education; and housing segregation and predatory lending practices. We will address what needs to change in order to dismantle poverty and inequality in the U.S. for future generations of all women. Same as WGS 321B and EDU310. Approved for ANT credit.                                                                  

CLA 252   Women in Antiquity: Women’s Voices and Women’s Bodies in Ancient Greece and Rome (3 hr)  
T.H.M. Gellar-Goad

Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15 p.m. 
Tribble A303

This course looks at the ancient world through seven specific figures — including Pandora, Sappho, Cleopatra, and Lily Ross Taylor — as a way of investigating women’s lives, words, work, and experience.  Students will have the opportunity to creatively explore Greece and Rome through the eyes of women from all walks of life: rulers and sex workers, poets and priestesses, freedwomen and figures of myth.  Prior study of Greek, Latin, or ancient civilizations is NOT required.  (CD)

 

COM 320A/620AG   Media Theory and Criticism    
Tuesday/ Thursday 11:00 – 12:15pm
Carswell 005

Media Theory and Criticism. (3h). Critical study of media, particularly film, including a survey of major theoretical frameworks.  Areas of emphasis include aesthetics, feminist theory, queer theory, structuralism, post-structuralism, and cultural studies.

COM 341    Public American Discourse II (3 hr)                                            
Meg Zulick
Wednesday/Friday 9:30am-10:45am                        
Carswell102

This course examines the interrelation of American rhetorical movements through the 19th century by reading and analyzing original speeches and documents. Among the movements addressed are labor, civil rights, student radicals, and women’s liberation.

EDU 31
0 Race, Class, and Gender in a Color-blind Society (3hr)
Sherri Lawson Clark
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15 pm
Room TBA

This course applies theoretical perspectives of the causes and consequences of social inequality for women of color to a broad array of texts and articles in the social sciences. We will examine important issues of motherhood and marriage; race and identity; class and education; and housing segregation and predatory lending practices. We will address what needs to change in order to dismantle poverty and inequality in the U.S. for future generations of all women. Same as WGS 321B  & AES 310. Approved for ANT credit.        

ENG 302 Reading Illness Narratives: Clinical and Literary Perspectives
( 3 hr)                   
Mary DeShazer/Richard McQuellon  
Wednesday 6:30-8:30 pm 
Tribble A202

How have modern writers represented the “kingdom of the sick”? This course will examine literature and films that probe the experience of living with (and sometimes dying of) a serious illness. From our perspectives as a literary scholar and a psychosocial oncologist, the professors will invite students to consider what people with life-threatening illness reveal in memoirs, how fictional, poetic, and theatrical representations of illness operate, and what literary and visual techniques artists use in creating narratives about illness. Students will also examine what these writers and filmmakers teach us about living close to death, how race and gender affect the themes and strategies of illness narratives, and how assigned texts depict the art of empathy and caregiving.Same as WGS 377C/677CG

ENG 340/ ENG 640G Mothers and Daughters: Literature and Theory (3hr)                                                                        
Mary DeShazer
Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45pm
Tribble A202

In this course we will examine the complexities of motherhood and mother-daughter relationships for contemporary women across cultures. After an introductory week, the class will be divided into two sections: (1) Multicultural U.S. representations of mothers and daughters in fiction, poetry, and theory, and (2) Maternal desire and the politicization of motherhood. Same as WGS 358A/658AG.

ESE 306 Topics in Entrepreneurship: Women Entrepreneurship / A Campus Community Collaborative (1.5 hr)  
Lynn Book

Monday   3:30 – 6:00 p.m.       
Kirby B01A

This course offers a dynamic opportunity for students to engage in a ‘collaborative laboratory’ with the Program for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship’s first “Innovators in Residence”, Margaret Norfleet Neff and Salem Neff, founders of Beta Verde in Winston-Salem.   This course will emphasize the particular vision and impact that women have at local and global levels regarding innovation, sustainability and social responsibility in matters of food traditions and food justice, regional economies and cultural and environmental diversity. This course will link with SOC 303.  Elective credit toward ESE minor.  Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement Requirement.             

HST 311A  Special Topics: Transgender History and Identity 
(3 hr)                                       
Angela Mazaris

Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45pm         
Tribble A104

This course explores the experiences of, and responses to transgender, gender non-conforming, and intersex (TGI) people in 19th and 20th century America. We will examine how scientific/medical authorities, legal authorities, and everyday people have understood and responded to various kinds of gender non-conformity. Course texts include social histories, medical and legal perspectives, popular culture, and the work of contemporary TGI activists.   Same as WGS 377F/ 377FG.

POL 229 Women, Gender, and Politics (3hr)
Michael Pisapia

Monday/Wednesday 2:00-3:15pm
Kirby 102

This course examines classical and contemporary arguments regarding the participation of women in politics, as well as current policy issues and changes in women’s political participation. 

POL 272  Democratic Theory (3hr)  
Michaelle Browers

Tuesday/Thursday   11:00-12:15pm                                                                         
Kirby B01B

This course examines the theoretical underpinnings of democracy and some of the critiques of those foundations.  With a significant focus on gender and other forms of difference, this course helps to understand some of the major theories of democracy and how key democratic concepts are defined differently within these various traditions.Same as WGS 321C/621CG:DemocracyandDifference.                                            

POL 277  Feminist Political Thought (3hr)
Michaelle Browers

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30-1:45 pm
Kirby B01B

This course will introduce students to debates and developments in contemporary feminist theorizing and their implications for the study and practice of politics.  Throughout the course we will pay close attention to the ways in which gender intersects with class, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and other forms of difference. Same as WGS 320A/. Approved for WGS Major Theory Requirement.

POL 286 Topics in Political Science: Politics of Gender and Sexuality (3 hr)             Sandya Hewamanne
Monday/Wednesday 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 pm
Tribble A4

This course will examine cultural constructions of gender from a cross-cultural perspective, by examining through texts, films and other material from popular culture the ways in which individuals and societies produce, negotiate, perform and contest dominant gender ideologies and identities.  We will look at how women at the intersections of gender, race, sexuality and other power hierarchies negotiate social control, globalization, empowerment, socio-cultural change and collective political action in diverse ways. Same as WGS 329. Same as ANT 329.

PSY 265 Human Sexuality  (3 hr)                                                                                        Phillip Batten
Tuesday/Thursday  3:30-4:45 pm                                          
Greene313   

An exploration of the psychological and physiological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to sexual mores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles.  P-PSY 151.

SOC 153   Contemporary Families (3 Hr)                                                    
Catherine Harnois
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15pm                         
Kirby 120

This course examines the social basis of the family, emphasizing the problems growing out of modern conditions and social change.                                                                                                                                                                          

SOC 303A Business and Society: Women and Entrepreneurship: Innovation, Sustainability and Social Responsibility  (3 hr)
Monday 3:30 – 6:00pm 
Angela Kóczé 
Kirby B01A

This course will give students the opportunity to learn about women and entrepreneurship through the themes of innovation, sustainability and social responsibility, and to engage in immersive hands-on experiences with local innovators and entrepreneurs. This course is linked to ESE 306 and gives the option of additional credit.  Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement Requirement.          

SOC 305 Gender in Society (3hr)
Catherine Harnois

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30 – 1:45 pm
Carswell 205

Significance of gender in society for individuals and institutions. An examination of differential gender experiences based on race, class, and sexual orientation. Consideration of feminism as a social movement and the possibility for social change.  (CD)

 

SOC 359  Race and Ethnic Relations (3hr)
Jasmine Harris-LaMothe
Monday/Wednesday/Friday   3:00 – 3:50 pm                     
Carswell 205

This course examines racial and ethnic group prejudice and discrimination and their effects on social relationships. It emphasizes the psychological and social theories of prejudice.  (CD)

THE 373 Women Playwrights (3 hr)  
J. K. Curry
Monday/Wednesday 12:30-1:45 pm
SFAC 214

An examination of selected plays and/or performance texts by women. Focus varies, for example, looking at works by contemporary American women or early women dramatists such as Hrosvitha, Sor Juana, and Aphra Behn. Same as WGS 319.  (CD)


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[1] course page: http://college.wfu.edu/wgs/undergraduateprogram/course-descriptions/wgs-101-window-on-womens-and-gender-studies/

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