Fall 2014 Course Schedule

WGS 101 Window on Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies   (1 hr)
Wanda Balzano/ David Phillips
Tuesday (9/2/2014 and 12/2/2014)  5:00-5:50 pm
Tribble / DeTamble A110

An opportunity to experience and reflect analytically on the diverse cultural and intellectual life of Wake Forest, with an emphasis on WGS events and topics. Students attend events and write about them. See course page.
(Class meets twice.)  P/F only.

WGS 221/WGS 620AG Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
(3 hr)
Wanda Balzano/Angela Kocze 
Wednesday 2:00-4:30 pm
Tribble A109

An interdisciplinary course that integrates materials from the humanities and the sciences, taught by WGS faculty representing at least two fields.  Topics include critical methods and practical solutions, history and theory of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, women in culture and society, and cross-cultural issues of gender, ethnicity, social class, disability, and sexual orientation.  (CD)

WGS 251 Race and Ethnic Diversity in America (3 hr)
Sherri Lawson-Clark
Wednesday/Friday  11:00am – 12:15pm                                                                                             WING 302

Different race and ethnic experiences are examined through an institutional approach that focuses on religion, work, schooling, marriage patterns, and culture from cross-cultural perspectives.  Same as AES 251A.  (CD)

WGS 320A/WGS 620AG    Gender and the Law (3 hr)                     
Shannon Gilreath
Wednesday    3:00-5:30 pm
Worrell 1309

This course will examine how the law affects women’s lives in a number of different contexts. The class will consider a number of different areas, including but not limited to employment, education, family responsibilities, violence against women, and other issues affecting women’s bodies, including pornography and prostitution. The class will also review a number of feminist legal theories and issues relating to the intersection of gender with race and class. Same as LAW 647. Approved for WGS Major Theory Requirement.

WGS 320B   Social Entrepreneurship (3 hr)
Angéla Kóczé
Tuesday/Thursday 3:30-4:45pm
Tribble A-4

This course will explore the theoretical background of women in leadership roles through social entrepreneurship. Throughout the semester, we will study the interlocking systems of gender, race, and class oppression, and how social change can be generated  through community engagement in the Latino community.  The framework of the course will allow students to confront and build arguments and knowledge to support particular demands for social change from local and global perspectives. Approved for WGS Major Theory Requirement. Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement requirement.

WGS 321B  Culture and the Sitcom (3hr)                                                   

Mary Dalton
Monday / Wednesday  2:00-3:15p.m.
Carswell 005

This seminar explores the intersection of American culture and the television situation comedy, one of the oldest and most ubiquitous forms of television programming.  In addition to studying the history and production of the sitcom and its relationship to other comedic forms, the course of study will include conventions of the form, the family, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, work and social class from a variety of perspectives, including cultural studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and reception studies. Same as COM 318A/670BG.  Approved for credit toward Film Studies.             

WGS 321C  Gender and Hitchcock (3hr)
Mary Dalton
Tuesday  2:00 –4:30
Carswell 005

This course will explore the films and life of Alfred Hitchcock in a number of historical, theoretical, and aesthetic contexts with a particular emphasis on the influence and representation of gendered relationships in motion pictures directed by Hitchcock.  There will be a required research paper and a final examination.  Same as COM 370/670. Approved for Credit toward Film Studies.

WGS 321D  Gender, Food, and the Body in Popular Culture (3hr)                                         Angela Yarber
Tuesday/Thursday  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                                                Tribble A-4

This course examines the intersection of gender, food, and the body, particularly within contemporary popular culture in the United States. Students will engage ecofeminist and queer readings that critique popular systems of beauty, sports/embodiment, disorder, and foodways in relation to gender. By the end of the course students will be able to deconstruct, analyze, and recreate through the lens of ecofeminism both gendered body marketing in commercials, magazines, ad campaigns, and food issues related to gender, animals, and sustainability.

WGS 321E   Researching Feminism, Social Justice and Public Engagement  (3 hr)                                              
Angéla Kóczé
Tuesday/Thursday  9:30 – 10:45am
Tribble A-4

This course is designed as an interdisciplinary, qualitative research course for students in the humanities and social sciences. Students will acquire and utilize research skills through community engagement in the Latino community. Throughout the course, we will also examine gender theory and feminist politics; explore feminist epistemologies and various research methods. We will focus on how feminist scholars challenge dominant theories of knowledge and the major methodologies employed in the social sciences and the humanities. Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement requirement.

WGS 321F   Gender, Sickness, and Health (3 hr)                          
Kristina Gupta 
Monday/Friday 11:00 – 12:15am                   
Tribble A-4

This course will examine the intersections of gender, medicine, health, and illness, with a focus on the U.S. context. Topics to be
covered include: reproduction, mental illness, breast cancer, heart disease, and HIV/AIDS, among others. We will explore the following questions: How have women and men interacted differently with the field of medicine, as healers, patients, and subjects of medical research? How do social and cultural norms about gender influence the definition of illness categories? What role does medicine play in defining and enforcing the boundaries of what is considered socially acceptable in terms of gender? How does gender as a social role affect health status and health outcomes?

WGS 377A/WGS 677AG     Communicating Across Differences – LGBTQ and Ally Peer Education (3 hr.)
Angela Mazaris
Tuesday   2:00-4:30pm
Greene 310

This is an experiental learning course that seeks to combat homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism by training students in peer-education skills focused on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) issues.  Students become peer educators, providing workshop activities throughout the year on campus.   Approved for WGS Major Public Engagement requirement.

WGS 377B    Masculinity, Power, and Sexuality (3hr) 
Kristina Gupta
Monday/Friday  2:00 – 3:15pm
Tribble A4

This course offers an introduction to the burgeoning interdisciplinary field of masculinity studies. Students will explore the social, historical, and cultural construction of masculinity and male roles (as fathers, sexual and romantic partners, and workers) and how these constructions differ according to race, class, sexuality, etc. In addition, the course will examine how norms about masculinity simultaneously empower men as a group and many individual men, while also disadvantaging many individual men and regulating the behavior of all men. Students will explore possibilities for challenging hegemonic forms of masculinity and for creating new types of masculinity.

WGS 396A  Independent Study (1-3 hr)    
Staff TBA

Independent projects in women’s and gender studies which either continue study begun in regular courses or develop new areas of interest.  Permission of Department.  POI.  

WGS 397A Internships in WGS (1.5-3.0 hr)
Sherri Lawson Clark
Wednesday 1:00-1:50 pm (8/27/14,10/22/14,12/3/14)
Tribble A4

Opportunities to engage with local social service providers in applying theoretical and empirical concepts learned in WGS classes to real world experiences in professional, supervised internships, performing direct services, conducting programmatic research, and/or receiving training in program administration.   

WGS 100C-J   RAD: Rape Aggression Defense for Women (1 hr)                                      Jeff Holleman/Gina Jones/Scott Smith

7 Sections: Sections C-H (3:30-5:20pm ; Sections I (2:00-2:55pm) ; Section J (1:00-1:55p.m.) Luter Lounge
C  8/26-10/07, Tuesday        D  10/21-12/02, Tuesday       E  08/27-10/08, Wednesday
F  10/22-12/03, Wednesday     G  08/28-10/09, Thursday     H  10/23-12/04, Thursday
I  08/27-10/13, Mon/Wed          J  10/20-12/03, Mon/Wed

A class that develops and enhances the options of self-defense for women in case of attack.  Includes basic physical self-defense tactics, risk reduction, and avoidance.  Requires violence against women readings.  P/F only.

Other Course Offerings for WGS Credit                                                   Fall 2014

AES 251   Race and Ethnic Diversity in America (3 hr)
Sherri Lawson Clark
Wednesday/Friday 11:00am-12:15pm
Room TBA

This course applies theoretical perspectives of the causes and consequences of social inequality for women of color to a broad array of texts and articles in the social sciences. We will examine important issues of motherhood and marriage; race and identity; class and education; and housing segregation and predatory lending practices. We will address what needs to change in order to dismantle poverty and inequality in the U.S. for future generations of all women. Same as WGS 251. (CD) 

ANT 385 Gender, Health, and Development (3 hr)
Karin Friederic  


Monday/Wednesday  2:00 –3:15pm
Carswell 018

This course examines the different health risks and experiences in health, illness, and poverty faced in distinct ways by men and women around the world. Using case studies on women and microcredit in Bangladesh, HIV/AIDS among men in Mexico, sexuality in New Guinea, and family planning in Haiti, we will examine the gendered dimensions of health and development and consider the benefits and limitations of gender-specific approaches.

COM 318A/COM 670BG  Culture and the Sitcom (3hr)
Mary Dalton
Monday/Wednesday  2:00 – 3:15 p.m.
Carswell 005

This seminar explores the intersection of American culture and the television situation comedy, one of the oldest and most ubiquitous forms of television programming.  In addition to studying the history and production of the sitcom and its relationship to other comedic forms, the course of study will include conventions of the form, the family, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, work and social class from a variety of perspectives, including cultural studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and reception studies. Same as WGS 321B.  Approved for credit toward Film Studies.

COM 340A  American Public Discourse  (3 hr)                                                                             Margaret Zulick
Wednesday/Friday  11:00 – 12:15 p.m.
Carswell 301

This course examines the interrelation of American rhetorical movements in the 20th century by reading and analyzing original speeches and documents.  Among the movements addressed are labor, civil rights, student radicals, and women’s liberation.

COM 370A/COM 670AG  Gender and Hitchcock (3hr)                                                                 Mary Dalton
Tuesday  2:00 – 4:30pm                                                                                                                        Carswell 005

This course will explore the films and life of Alfred Hitchcock in a number of historical, theoretical, and aesthetic contexts with a particular emphasis on the influence and representation of gendered relationships in motion pictures directed by Hitchcock.  There will be a required research paper and a final examination.  Same as WGS 321C.  Approved for Credit toward Film Studies.

ENG 301A/ENG 601AG           Individual Authors: Oscar Wilde (3hr)                                         Melissa Jenkins
Monday/Wednesday    2:00-3:15pm                                                                                             Room TBA

This course presents the varied oeuvre of Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), the self-proclaimed “Professor of Aesthetics” and, arguably, the first modern literary celebrity. The reading list will balance a reconsideration of his most famous works (The Importance of Being Earnest, The Picture of Dorian Gray, De Profundis) with exposure to challenging, lesser-known works such as Salomé, the fairy tales, and the Poems in Prose. We will also attend to Wilde’s most important influences (Pater and Ruskin), to the controversial censorship of his “filthy” writings and the policing of his personal life (which culminated in his imprisonment for then-illegal homosexual activity), and, finally, the varied approaches to adapting his works in the years after his death.

ENG 301B   Jane Austen  (3 hr)
Jessica Richard
Tuesday/Thursday  9:30-10:45 am
Room TBA

Study of selected work from an important American or British author. (D)

ENG 381A  Studies in African-American Literature ( 3 hr)                                                           Rian Bowie
 Tuesday/Thursday   9:30-10:45 pm                                                                                             Room TBA

This course will examine a variety of contemporary texts that directly or indirectly signify upon eighteenth and nineteenth century bodies of knowledge about slavery, gender, and freedom.  In particular, discussions will focus on some of the ways that modern artists have both reaffirmed and re-imagined these complex histories in both form and content.  Each work, to a degree, challenges the seemingly stable assumptions about race, geography, and identity.    (CD)                                                

HMN 290A  Innovation and Inclusivity (3 hr)                                                                               David Phillips
Tuesday/Thursday  2:00 – 3:15 p.m.
Tribble A305

Introduction to themes in an emerging global culture; an appreciation of human diversity and the value of thinking about culture from more than one disciplinary angle; contextual understanding of upper-level humanities by using methodologies from literary studies, historiography, religious studies, ethics, gender studies, and arts.  (CD), Approved for INS Global Thematic Studies.     

HST 337A Gender in Early America (3 hr)                                                                  
Michele Gillespie
Monday/Wednesday  12:00 – 1:45 p.m.                                                                                     Tribble A104

History of gender roles from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. Examines the social constructions of femininity and masculinity and their political and cultural significance. (CD)

HST 359A Gender and Sexuality in Modern Latin American History (3 hr)
Mir Yarfitz
Tuesday/Thursday 11:00am – 12:15pm
Tribble A208

Travel back in time with film, fiction, poetry and art. Meet female guerrillas, migrant prostitutes, and transgender warriors. Guaranteed to change your ideas about masculinity, femininity, sexuality, and our neighbors to the south. No background required. Also approved for LALS Credit.

PSY 265 Human Sexuality  (3 hr)
Phillip Batten
Monday/Wednesday  8:00-9:15 am
Greene313

An exploration of the psychological and physiological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to sexual mores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles.  P-PSY 151.

PSY 364A  Stereotyping and Prejudice (3 hr)                                                                            Catherine Seta
Tuesday/Thursday  11:00 – 12:15 p.m.                             
Greene 313

Theoretical and empirical examination of the processes underlying prejudice, discrimination, and racism.  P-PSY 151 (CD, D).

REL 318A/REL 618AG  Feminist and Contemporary Interpretations of the New Testament (3hr)                                  
Mary Foskett
Monday/Wednesday  12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
WING 206

Study of feminist and contemporary approaches to the New Testament in light of the history of New Testament interpretation and a range of contemporary concerns and interpretive contexts.

SOC 153   Contemporary Families (3 Hr)
Catherine Harnois
Tuesday/Thursday 2:00-3:15pm
Kirby 101

This course examines the social basis of the family, emphasizing the problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. P-PSY 151 (CD, D).

SOC 305A Gender in Society (3hr)
Catherine Harnois

Tuesday/Thursday 2:00 – 3:15 pm
Kirby B01A

Significance of gender in society for individuals and institutions. An examination of differential gender experiences based on race, class, and sexual orientation. Consideration of feminism as a social movement and the possibility for social change.  (CD)

 

SPA 348A   Contemporary Women Novelists and their Female Characters (3 hr) Candelas Gala
 Tuesday/Thursday  2:00 – 3:15 p.m.                                                                                                   Greene 320

A study of representative novels by women writers from Spain and Latin America, with emphasis on the representation of the female protagonist within her cultural context.  P-SPN 317, SPN 318, SPA 217, or SPA 218