Wednesday’s Word of the Week

enantiodromic, n. “The process by which something becomes its opposite, and the subsequent interaction of the two: applied esp. to the adoption by an individual or by a community, etc., of a set of beliefs, etc., opposite to those held at an earlier stage.” “The Writing Center hopes that students will become enantiodromic in how they approach […]

Tuesday’s Tip: Love/Hate Writing

I had to laugh out loud when I read the title of a blog post from Crew: Dear Writing, I hate you: Lessons from 7 famous authors who hated their job. Wow. Just wow. It’s no secret that writing is a hard job. “Despite their successes, there are hundreds of famous authors and writers out there […]

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

renitent, adj. “That offers physical resistance to motion, deformation, or pressure.” “The renitent tumor did not respond to the treatment as the doctor’s had hoped.” “renitent, adj. and n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2015. Web. 22 September 2015.

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

whinge, v. “To whine; esp. to complain peevishly.” “The little boy whinged to his mother until she bought him the candy he wanted.” “whinge, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2015. Web. 22 September 2015.

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

hoyden, n. “a boisterous noisy girl.” “She couldn’t care less that her classmates called her a hoyden. Her boisterous attitude was a great source of pride.” “hoyden, n. and adj.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2015. Web. 22 September 2015.

Wednesday’s Word of the Week: Winter Edition

  National Geographic published three winter words that you should know. Make sure to read up on these – don’t get caught in the snow!  

Wednesday’s Words of the Week: Thanksgiving Edition

  The folks at the Oxford English Dictionary recently shared a few words they are thankful for.  What words are you thankful for?

Ta-Nehisi Coates on Writing

Writing teachers talk about revision, discipline, and the recursive nature of the writing process. Here’s a new way to frame what we mean. “It’s not really that mystical. It’s like repeated practice over and over and you suddenly become something you had no idea you could be,” says Ta-Nehisi Coates, a national correspondent for The […]

Slavery, Politics, and English Grammar

In his essay “Politics and the English Language,” George Orwell made plain the ways in which those in power use language and grammar to obfuscate, conceal and abdicate responsibility. Grammar remains as political as ever, as Ellen Bresler Rockmore, a lecturer in the Institute for Writing and Rhetoric at Dartmouth, makes clear in her op-ed […]

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

draggle, v. “To drag or trail (through the dirt).” “The dog draggled his toy across the yard all day long. Once he was alseep, his owner put the toy straight into the washer.” “draggle, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2015. Web. 22 September 2015.