Word of the Week

benthos, n. “Name for the flora and fauna at or near the bottom of the sea.” “Ariel and Sebastian stage an elaborate song and dance among the benthos.” “benthos, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2017. Web. 31 May 2017.

Word of the Week

bibliopole, n. “A dealer in books, a bookseller.” “The bibliopole at the downtown bookstore suggested some great summer books to take to the beach.” “bibliopole, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2017. Web. 31 May 2017.

Word of the Week

bletherskate, n. “Foolish talk; nonsense.” “Before she gets her coffee in the morning, she pretty much just says bletherskate.” “ˈbletherskate | ˈblatherskite, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2017. Web. 31 May 2017.  

Word of the Week

bruxism, n. “Involuntary or unconscious grinding or clenching of the teeth, esp. during sleep.” “After his doctor found symptoms of bruxism, the young man had to wear a retainer to bed each night.”  “bruxism, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2017. Web. 31 May 2017.

Word of the Week

cacoethes, n. “An evil habit.” “Jake’s cacoethes of talking out of turn caused a number of distractions in the classroom.” “cacoethes, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2017. Web. 31 May 2017.

Word of the Week

fantod, adj. “Fidgetty, restless.” “His fantod fingers were eager to start writing for WaFoWriMo.” “fantod, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2015. Web. 22 September 2015. What to learn more?

Wednesdays Word of the Week – Halloween Edition

                sciomancy, n. “Divination through communication with the spirits of the dead.” “She tried sciomancy and a ouija board to predict her grade in the course.” “sciomancy, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2014. Web. 29 October 2014. Want more spooky words? Check out this link

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

                  aa, n. “A kind of volcanic lava with a rough, jagged surface covered with loose clinkers.” “As we toured the Hawaiian volcanoes on our spring break trip, we  saw plenty of aa lava from previous volcanic eruptions.” “aa, n.2.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2016. Web. 16 March 2016.

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

avuncular, adj. “Of, belonging to, or resembling, an uncle.” “I spent all weekend watching Fuller House, and it was great to see Danny, Uncle Jesse, and avuncular Joey back together.” “avuncular, adj.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, December 2015. Web. 2 March 2016.

Wednesday’s Word of the Week

coterie, n. 1. “An organized association of persons for political, social, or other purposes; a club” 2. “A circle of persons associated together and distinguished from ‘outsiders’, a ‘set’” “A coterie of the candidate’s supporters worked hard to make sure the rally was a success.” “coterie, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, December 2015. Web. 24 February 2016.